The Sun sale Is outlet online sale Also a Star sale

The Sun sale Is outlet online sale Also a Star sale

The Sun sale Is outlet online sale Also a Star sale
The Sun sale Is outlet online sale Also a Star sale__left
The Sun sale Is outlet online sale Also a Star sale__front

Description

Product Description

The #1 New York Times bestseller and National Book Award finalist from the bestselling author of Everything, Everything will have you falling in love with Natasha and Daniel as they fall in love with each other!

Natasha:
I’m a girl who believes in science and facts. Not fate. Not destiny. Or dreams that will never come true. I’m definitely not the kind of girl who meets a cute boy on a crowded New York City street and falls in love with him. Not when my family is twelve hours away from being deported to Jamaica. Falling in love with him won’t be my story.

Daniel: I’ve always been the good son, the good student, living up to my parents’ high expectations. Never the poet. Or the dreamer. But when I see her, I forget about all that. Something about Natasha makes me think that fate has something much more extraordinary in store—for both of us.

The Universe: Every moment in our lives has brought us to this single moment. A million futures lie before us. Which one will come true? 

***

"Beautifully crafted." 
--People 

"A book that is very much about the many factors that affect falling in love, as much as it is about the very act itself. . . . Fans of Yoon’s first novel, Everything Everything, will find much to love—if not, more—in what is easily an even stronger follow up." —Entertainment Weekly

"Transcends the limits of YA as a human story about falling in love and seeking out our futures." —POPSUGAR.com





Review

The #1 New York Times Bestseller 
A National Book Award Finalist
A Michael L. Printz Honor Book
A New York Times Notable Book
A BuzzFeed Best YA Book of the Year
A POPSUGAR Best Book of the Year
Publishers Weekly Best Book of the Year
Kirkus Reviews Best Book of the Year
Booklist Editor''s Choice
A New York Public Library Best Book for Teens
Recipient of the John Steptoe New Talent Award
A Walter Award Honor Book


★ "An  exhilarating, hopeful novel exploring identity, family, the love of science and the science of love, dark matter and interconnectedness--is about seeing and being seen and the possibility of love... a nd it shines." Shelf Awareness, starred review 
 
★ “Moving and  suspenseful.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review 

★ “Lyrical and sweeping,  full of hope, heartbreak, fate. . . and the universal beating of the human heart." — Booklist, starred review

★ " Fresh and compelling." — The Horn Book, starred review

★ "With appeal to cynics and romantics alike, this profound exploration of life and love tempers harsh realities with the beauty of hope in a way that is both deeply moving and satisfying."— Kirkus, starred review

★ “ A love story that is smart without being cynical, heartwarming without being cloying, and schmaltzy in all the best ways.”— The Bulletin, starred review

"This wistful love story  will be adored by fans of Rainbow Rowell’s  Eleanor & Park."—SLJ


Praise for Everything, Everything:

“[A] fresh,  moving debut.” — Entertainment Weekly

Gorgeous and  lyrical.” — The New York Times Book Review

Will give you butterflies.” — Seventeen

 “A  do-not-miss for fans of John Green and Rainbow Rowell (aka everyone).” — Justine

 “YA book lovers,  your newest obsession is here.”—MTV.com

About the Author

NICOLA YOON is the author of the #1 New York Times bestsellers The Sun Is Also a Star and Everything, Everything, her debut novel, which was turned into a major motion picture. She grew up in Jamaica and Brooklyn and lives in Los Angeles with her family. She’s also a hopeless romantic who firmly believes that you can fall in love in an instant and that it can last forever.

Follow @NicolaYoon on Tumblr, Twitter, and Instagram.



Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

 
prologue
 
 
CARL SAGAN SAID that if you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe. When he says “from scratch,” he means from nothing. He means from a time before the world even existed. If you want to make an apple pie from nothing at all, you have to start with the Big Bang and expanding universes, neutrons, ions, atoms, black holes, suns, moons, ocean tides, the Milky Way, Earth, evolution, dinosaurs, extinction-level events, platypuses, Homo erectus, Cro-Magnon man, etc. You have to start at the beginning. You must invent fire. You need water and fertile soil and seeds. You need cows and people to milk them and more people to churn that milk into butter. You need wheat and sugar cane and apple trees. You need chemistry and biology. For a really good apple pie, you need the arts. For an apple pie that can last for generations, you need the printing press and the Industrial Revolution and maybe even a poem.
 
 
To make a thing as simple as an apple pie, you have to create the whole wide world.
 
 
daniel
 
 
Local Teen Accepts Destiny, Agrees to Become Doctor, Stereotype
 
 
It’s Charlie’s fault that my summer (and now fall) has been one absurd headline after another. Charles Jae Won Bae, aka Charlie, my older brother, firstborn son of a firstborn son, surprised my parents (and all their friends, and the entire gossiping Korean community of Flushing, New York) by getting kicked out of Harvard University ( Best School, my mother said, when his acceptance letter arrived). Now he’s been kicked out of Best School, and all summer my mom frowns and doesn’t quite believe and doesn’t quite understand.
 
 
Why you grades so bad? They kick you out? Why they kick you out? Why not make you stay and study more?
 
 
My dad says, Not kick out. Require to withdraw. Not the same as kick out.
 
 
Charlie grumbles: It’s just temporary, only for two semesters.
 
 
Under this unholy barrage of my parents’ confusion and shame and disappointment, even I almost feel bad for Charlie. Almost.
 
 
natasha
 
MY MOM SAYS IT’S TIME for me to give up now, and that what I’m doing is futile. She’s upset, so her accent is thicker than usual, and every statement is a question.
 
 
“You no think is time for you to give up now, Tasha? You no think that what you doing is futile?”
 
 
She draws out the first syllable of futile for a second too long. My dad doesn’t say anything. He’s mute with anger or impotence. I’m never sure which. His frown is so deep and so complete that it’s hard to imagine his face with another expression. If this were even just a few months ago, I’d be sad to see him like this, but now I don’t really care. He’s the reason we’re all in this mess.
 
 
Peter, my nine-year-old brother, is the only one of us happy with this turn of events. Right now, he’s packing his suitcase and playing “No Woman, No Cry” by Bob Marley. “Old- school packing music,” he called it.
 
 
Despite the fact that he was born here in America, Peter says he wants to live in Jamaica. He’s always been pretty shy and has a hard time making friends. I think he imagines that Jamaica will be a paradise and that, somehow, things will be better for him there.
 
 
The four of us are in the living room of our one-bedroom apartment. The living room doubles as a bedroom, and Peter and I share it. It has two small sofa beds that we pull out at night, and a bright blue curtain down the middle for privacy. Right now the curtain is pulled aside so you can see both our halves at once.
 
 
It’s pretty easy to guess which one of us wants to leave and which wants to stay. My side still looks lived-in. My books are on my small IKEA shelf. My favorite picture of me and my best friend, Bev, is still sitting on my desk. We’re wearing safety goggles and sexy-pouting at the camera in physics lab. The safety goggles were my idea. The sexy-pouting was hers. I haven’t removed a single item of clothing from my dresser. I haven’t even taken down my NASA star map poster. It’s huge—actually eight posters that I taped together—and shows all the major stars, constellations, and sections of the Milky Way visible from the Northern Hemisphere. It even has instructions on how to find Polaris and navigate your way by stars in case you get lost. The poster tubes I bought for packing it are leaning unopened against the wall.
 
 
On Peter’s side, virtually all the surfaces are bare, most of his possessions already packed away into boxes and suitcases.
 
 
My mom is right, of course—what I’m doing is futile. Still, I grab my headphones, my physics textbook, and some comics. If I have time to kill, maybe I can finish up my homework and read.
 
 
Peter shakes his head at me. “Why are you bringing that?” he asks, meaning the textbook. “We’re leaving, Tasha. You don’t have to turn in homework.”
 
 
Peter has just discovered the power of sarcasm. He uses it every chance he gets.
 
 
I don’t bother responding to him, just put my headphones on and head for the door. “Back soon,” I say to my mom.
 
 
She kisses her teeth and turns away. I remind myself that she’s not upset with me. Tasha, is not you me upset with, you know? is something she says a lot these days. I’m going to the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) building in downtown Manhattan to see if someone there can help me. We are undocumented immigrants, and we’re being deported tonight.
 
 
Today is my last chance to try to convince someone—or fate—to help me find a way to stay in America.
 
 
To be clear: I don’t believe in fate. But I’m desperate.

Product information

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Videos

Help others learn more about this product by uploading a video!
Upload video
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who bought this item also bought

Customer reviews

4.6 out of 54.6 out of 5
5,295 global ratings

Reviews with images

Top reviews from the United States

Dylanthereader5
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I loved this book SO much but I find it hard ...
Reviewed in the United States on September 23, 2017
I loved this book SO much but I find it hard to write a long review for books that I love for some reason so I’m simply going to share my feels through lists. What I liked: The Characters: Yoon really has a talent of making her characters so... See more
I loved this book SO much but I find it hard to write a long review for books that I love for some reason so I’m simply going to share my feels through lists.

What I liked:

The Characters:

Yoon really has a talent of making her characters so vibrant and fleshed out that they practically jump off the pages. It’s such a diverse cast of characters that it just wasn’t your plain Jane- cyst gendered white individuals.

The writing:

To my surprise- I really enjoyed Nicola’s writing style. It flowed so well and even if it technically a “slow” part of the story, I still had to force myself to stop reading because I didn’t want the experience to stop.

The format:

This novel was told in alternating pov’s between Daniel and Natasha which switched every other chapter. Occasionally, there was a extra little chapter written in a pov from someone that you wouldn’t even expect to be important to the story.

For example, one of the chapters was in the point of view of a security guard that Natasha comes in contact with for just a mere two pages. You wouldn’t think that the stranger’s point of view had any way of propelling the story forward, but chapters like those were probably my favorite of the book and it just made it so much more unique than it already was before this format was introduced.

The story:

A huge theme of this book is Immigration. Natasha was born in Jamaica but is at risk, along with her family of getting deported back after her father’s DUI. Yoon does an amazing job at really humanizing immigration so you can actually understand what they are going through, which I think is really important.

The romance:

Daniel and Natasha fall in love in under 24 hours. While this is technically insta-love, it doesn’t exactly feel like it. They get so much accomplished in terms of getting to know each other in that short of a time that it feels like they have known each other for a span of years.

Nicola has also made the characters so opposite from each other but so much alike at the same time so that they fit together like pieces of a puzzle.

This was such an incredible story that I won’t be forgetting for a very long time.
56 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
SimplyAlexandra
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Swoony + The Butterfly Effect with Diverse Characters // I loved this more than Everything, Everything!
Reviewed in the United States on August 9, 2018
4 Stars - I recommend if you enjoy YA and are looking for diverse representation in your reading. Natasha is being deported today. She''s being deported because her father made a mistake. Because of his mistake, her future is ruined. Daniel is on the path that his... See more
4 Stars - I recommend if you enjoy YA and are looking for diverse representation in your reading.

Natasha is being deported today. She''s being deported because her father made a mistake. Because of his mistake, her future is ruined. Daniel is on the path that his parents want. Go to Yale, become a doctor, marry a nice Korean girl. Daniel would rather be a poet. He lets the wind blow him where it will before his interview for Yale. The wind blows him toward Natasha.

Nicola Yoon. Gets me every time. Her books are light and fluffy, but they also carry deeper things beneath the surface. This book is more emotional and complex than Everything, Everything. The depiction of two children of immigrant parents is absolutely vivid and intricate. I love that this book is written from multiple perspectives, and as always with Nicola Yoon, the chapters are short and you just fly through it. I enjoyed reading from both Natasha and Daniel''s perspectives, but I will say that I REALLY love teenage male protagonists. So much sarcasm! :P I also liked how this book contains segments about their parent''s history, perspectives of people they interact with, etc. The way it''s all woven together is really lovely. I cried a bit, and I felt happy and sad for all of the characters. It''s just a really thoughtful portrayal of growing up, families, immigration, etc. etc. With the way it ends, I would love to read a follow-up. :) I hope that she writes more books soon! :)
25 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Literaturephile
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Sweet Love Story
Reviewed in the United States on December 5, 2017
Nicola Yoon weaves a charming story about two young lovers. Natasha Kingsley is running out of time. She is an undocumented Jamaican immigrant facing deportation to a country that no longer feels like home. Daniel Bae, a first a generation Korean American, is... See more
Nicola Yoon weaves a charming story about two young lovers.

Natasha Kingsley is running out of time. She is an undocumented Jamaican immigrant facing deportation to a country that no longer feels like home. Daniel Bae, a first a generation Korean American, is torn between pursuing his passion and living his parents'' version of the American dream.

By random chance, Natasha and Daniel meet on her final day in the U.S. And what follows is a sweet love story that will help readers believe that love is more than a hormonal reaction.

Once I started reading this story, I could not put it down! Daniel is a hopeless romantic, while Natasha is a pragmatic scientist. Their banter left me laughing and crying. I haven''t read such a delightful love story in a long time.

Nicola Yoon''s refreshing writing style will enchant readers. And kudos to Yoon for opening her novel with a Carl Sagan quote. After posting this review, I will definitely re-listen to "Big Blue Dot."

5/5 stars
24 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Jordan Max
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
creative and well written.
Reviewed in the United States on September 18, 2018
It was between this book and #BadMan (ha!) and I’m glad I chose something a little lighter⭐️! Bright, breezy story about two high school students: a Jamaican girl on her last day in NYC before she and her immigrant family are deported; and a Korean boy on his way to an... See more
It was between this book and #BadMan (ha!) and I’m glad I chose something a little lighter⭐️! Bright, breezy story about two high school students: a Jamaican girl on her last day in NYC before she and her immigrant family are deported; and a Korean boy on his way to an interview for the college of his parents’ dreams...the two spend the day together, she a realist, he a dreamer, and together teach each other a different way of looking at life ☀️. I thought the teenage characters were believable and interesting and I loved the narrative structure told through different POVs and informative interstitials. It’s YA, but I think it’s a good recommendation for all audiences!
15 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
H. J. Ortiz
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The Sun Is Also a Star Book Review
Reviewed in the United States on August 3, 2019
My initial reaction: Eh. It''s okay. Just not for me.  I had a similar reaction to this book as I did to the one I read before it, My Favorite Half Night Stand. In a way, I can see how someone could fall in love with these characters, their stories, their... See more
My initial reaction: Eh. It''s okay. Just not for me. 

I had a similar reaction to this book as I did to the one I read before it, My Favorite Half Night Stand. In a way, I can see how someone could fall in love with these characters, their stories, their struggles, and the romance of the whole novel. However, I was not one of those people. I am not one for romances or any love stories. I read this, per a friend''s request. It was not originally my intention to pick this novel up, and after reading it, it confirmed my thoughts that this book would be a good read for its audience but not for me.

For me, the struggles that I cared about (the struggles within the families) got glossed over. There were some really good moments of tension that gave me the understanding that there were issues within both characters'' lives; however, I would have loved more of it. The main struggles that guided the characters throughout the novel kind of took over the story for me, and I times I felt the need to know more about both Natasha and Daniel to really understand them and empathize with them. Again, their families, their backgrounds, and their current struggles were mentioned, but I don''t know why they weren''t enough for me. I had conflicting emotions about how to feel toward both characters.

Another aspect of the novel that did not work for me was the structure. The way the chapters were set up made sense so the reader knows the point of view of the narrator, but for me, the setup annoyed me more than other multiple narration novels. After a while, the "Observable Fact," that kept popping up in the novel just got on my nerves. If it would have persisted throughout the entire novel, I would have just put it down and gave up, because it did get to the point that it just completely annoyed me. However it did stop after a while, which I was grateful for. Also, the small chapter interjections of other characters that the main narrators (Natasha and Daniel) run into simply confused me. I didn''t know if I was supposed to care about those characters, if their parts were supposed to be important later on in the story, or if it was added simply to give a summary of those characters.

I do believe that, for the appropriate audience, the novel hit the mark. The novel was a very quick read for me, and I was able to get through it without much difficulty (reading-wise). I do think that for someone like me who is not accustomed to reading this genre, the book may go as far as seeming bland or lacking action or other elements. I am accustomed to reading books full of action and tension scenes. I got the tension from this novel but not enough action. I got one of the elements I enjoy when reading and therefore was able to get through it; however, I also see how someone reading outside their genre may not enjoy this book.
6 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
KimGM
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The sort of novel I love to get lost in
Reviewed in the United States on February 14, 2019
Some books are so good that you don''t want the story to end. That''s how I felt while reading Nicola Yoon''s The Sun Is Also a Star. This beautifully written story of chance encounters (or was it fate?), taking chances and consequences left me with a book hangover. I ended up... See more
Some books are so good that you don''t want the story to end. That''s how I felt while reading Nicola Yoon''s The Sun Is Also a Star. This beautifully written story of chance encounters (or was it fate?), taking chances and consequences left me with a book hangover. I ended up going back and rereading certain chapters because I loved how Yoon rendered the characters and made them real and flawed and relatable.

I also loved the flow of the story--despite Natasha and Daniel only having a few hours together, I truly felt like we stepped into their world and saw them and experienced everything with them. The same is true for the setting. New York City Yoon comes alive in The Sun Is Also a Star--we get a sense of its pace, its smells, its pulse.

Absolutely loved every minute of The Sun Is Also a Star. I think I may have to re-read it and get lost again in Natasha and Daniel''s story.
9 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
m. chvz
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I feel feels...
Reviewed in the United States on March 27, 2019
I had picked up this book mostly because I tend to pick up YA reads a bit mindlessly and I live mentions of stars, suns or moons in titles. I''m a sucker. They feel fated for me to read.... annnnnnd well, that''s exactly why I loved it. Because I found bits of... See more
I had picked up this book mostly because I tend to pick up YA reads a bit mindlessly and I live mentions of stars, suns or moons in titles. I''m a sucker. They feel fated for me to read....

annnnnnd well, that''s exactly why I loved it. Because I found bits of myself in both Daniel and Natasha, in their histories, the way their thinking was formed, and the way the universe seemed to want to make it''s self known through and to them.

It''s a quick read, written well enough that you can get things out of it no matter the age (I''m not a YA age lmao), and I fell for the wording and the angst and the little love that may or may not have bloomed because no spoilers... lol.

I cried. Ugly cried at the end... because I''d love to believe everything happens for a reason...

and it''s going to be in theaters soon as a movie and I always want to read the book before the movie so that made me get to it lol 😂

I genuinely loved it to pieces 🌞💛
7 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Thebookbella
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The convergence of both love and logic
Reviewed in the United States on April 2, 2019
"Sometimes your world shakes so hard, it''s difficult to imagine that everyone else isn''t feeling it too." Daniel is a poetically intense boy, with Korean heritage. Natasha is a logical and practical girl, who is being deported back to Jamaica. This... See more
"Sometimes your world shakes so hard, it''s difficult to imagine that everyone else isn''t feeling it too."

Daniel is a poetically intense boy, with Korean heritage. Natasha is a logical and practical girl, who is being deported back to Jamaica.

This entire book takes place in the span of a day, it''s about fate and love and destiny. What was so wonderful about all of this is the push and pull of the logical with the emotional perspective. Two sides of the same coin, this book is told in alternating perspectives of Daniel and Natasha. He is the Cupid to her Psyche. She the logic of love and fate, the rational voice. He is the passionate and intensely emotional voice to destiny and love.

Usually this would seemed like an instalove situation if it hadn''t of been so well written. While no one is really a fan of instalove, this pulls it off with flying colors and this ended up being an all time favorite. I loved this so much.

There was a certain emphasis with outside forces and how it can effect love and the longevity of it. How long love endures does not depict how true it is.

I loved the space and universe references of Natasha, her scientific knowledge as applied to love gave this book a unique voice that made the love feel more profound and timeless.

While I can''t begin to pick a favorite voice in this, because both Daniel and Natasha added so much to the narrative, I love the spin Natasha''s perspective gave to this.

I clearly cannot gush enough with how I loved this book to the moon and back. It was so beautiful on describing that the human nature is both logical and emotional and really these narratives converge on the inner conflict of an individual when dealing with love.
5 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report

Top reviews from other countries

Simant Verma
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Cute & magical!
Reviewed in India on February 17, 2018
I am such a sucker for cute romances and this book was no less. You must have heard how this book is all about insta-love and how people usually hate that. I agree. I too hate insta-loves in most of the cases, but this book doesn’t fall into that case, for me. Despite...See more
I am such a sucker for cute romances and this book was no less. You must have heard how this book is all about insta-love and how people usually hate that. I agree. I too hate insta-loves in most of the cases, but this book doesn’t fall into that case, for me. Despite insta-love-y storyline, in the beginning, I loved it because it was more than that. I loved both Daniel and Natasha as the characters and I loved Nicola Yoon’s writing, though it was my first ever read of hers. The whole story takes place in ONE day so you can’t argue with the insta-love plot, can you? I mean there are always limitations to writing a story in such a short period of time. I usually don’t understand how two people meet for the first time and fall in love instantly when they are quite different? But believe me, this story was so perfectly written that you would actually ignore the insta-love plot and would start rooting for Daniel and Natasha 🙂 Probably, I should talk about the ending at the end of this review but I think it is better if I do it right here. We have a nice perception related to insta-love stories regarding how they would end. I had same expectations from this story too. But Nicola Yoon did a wonderful job with the ending part. Though my little heart broke badly, I was happy that she chose this ending. That made the story more believable but yes I wished it to be a little longer. Natasha and Daniel are two teens who find each other one fine day in New York. Natasha was an undocumented migrant and was about to be deported to Jamaica that day because of a mistake her father made. Daniel was the son of two South Korean parents but was born in America. Daniel and Natasha were totally different. One was a believer in love while another was a believer in science. Nicola Yoon created an atmosphere where two people meet who are so different yet bound together by time, destiny, love and who are “meant to be” somehow. A unique thing about the representation of the story was the change of perspectives. I loved how the story was switched between Natasha’s and Daniel’s perspectives, but the better thing was including the perspectives of minor side characters and third person chapters too, which made the story more interesting. For example, there were chapters related to the history of hair products for black people, which definitely made the little insights into the story more interesting. There were some chapters related to past of a few characters who played a significant role in the story. Those memories show us how the choices made by a person can affect their future and how those choices can impact other peoples lives. This story was more about life than love. No matter what decision you make, it is going to affect your present and future. And if it is meant to be, then it has to be. Life is full of surprises and you don’t know what would come next. But giving up is not the option. Nicola Yoon has presented a lot of diversity in this book. There is a strong representation of immigration issues and race. Daniel and Natasha both are immigrants but the difference is one is legal while the another is undocumented. The migration story from both the perspectives offer their own messages and struggles and represent family and identity thus making the story more than just the romance. Apart from diversity, the issues like loneliness and mental health have also been raised. There is a side character whose story I loved. This tells you that how little gestures can make an impact on peoples lives. This story gives you hope and courage. but most importantly, it makes you find the light within yourself. Overall, this was a fantastic read and now I am a fan of Nicol Yoon’s writing. The build-up of the story was good and the characters were adorable. The story was well written and also it was fast-paced. All the immigrant’s issues were presented so well. They were hard to digest but I am glad that Nicola Yoon has not sugarcoated anything. If you are looking for a diverse YA contemporary read with a cute romance, then this book is definitely for you. This story is just magical!
64 people found this helpful
Report
Yasmin Darharbah
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
So amazing that it brought tears to my eyes for literally no reason!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 8, 2018
The Sun Is Also a Star, is a touching story about two teenagers who deserve the chance to get to know each other, but risk having it ripped away from them before it’s even really begun. The novel takes place in New York City, where Natasha is on a mission to save her family...See more
The Sun Is Also a Star, is a touching story about two teenagers who deserve the chance to get to know each other, but risk having it ripped away from them before it’s even really begun. The novel takes place in New York City, where Natasha is on a mission to save her family from being deported back to Jamaica. On her journey she meets Daniel, who, due to a combination of bizarre and seemingly meant-to-be moments, notices her from afar and feels that he must get to know her. Over the course of their day, Daniel tries to undermine Natasha’s belief that both love and fate aren’t real, and that science explains everything. It’s a beautiful read, consistently making me want to laugh and cry, and question my own opinions in regard to how the universe works. Firstly, I’d like to mention that the cover art for this book is absolutely stunning. Upon finishing it, I understood its meaning immediately: that every second, different people, things and circumstances are all brought together, and they clash to create an outburst of consequences that have a huge impact on the rest of our lives. We make hundreds of decisions every single day, and each of these decisions leads to a different future where hundreds of more decisions lie. The outcome depends on which route we take. The cover and the novel, both encourage readers to think about everything they do with an open mind, and to be careful with how we effect other people’s journeys. Leading on from that, I love how every event in the novel was interlinked with another, how every person we were introduced to either had a hand in how Daniel and Natasha’s lives played out, or vice-versa. It shows how even saying one kind (or rude) word to a stranger can influence them to make a huge life-changing decision. The novel also dealt well with racism and how young people cope with having extremely prejudice parents. Daniel’s father’s disrespect towards Natasha and his embarrassment, I felt was written incredibly well and worked towards giving the characters more dimension. It’s realistic to write, not only about two characters who are both considered minorities in Twenty-First Century America, but who also don’t conform to the stereotypes placed on them. Daniel’s issues with his Korean parents wanting what’s best for him instead of what makes him happiest, and Natasha’s father wanting what’s best for himself instead of what’s best for his family, gives them common ground which many readers will be able to identify with. Yoon portrays realistic family dynamics in showing that they are complicated and hardly ever perfect. Although I loved The Sun Is Also a Star, the reason I’m not giving it five stars, is that it was a little hard to get into. I think this was because the chapters started off very short and kept switching perspectives, however I understand that this was necessary to get the whole concept across. More into the middle I began to enjoy the short chapters because they gave us access to what each character was thinking in any particular moment. Something else that bothered me, was Natasha’s personality. As brutal as that sounds, she was a bit hard to like because of her pessimistic nature and how rude she was to Daniel at times, but as the story went on and he warmed her heart, she was much easier to read. The ending was absolutely amazing – so amazing that it brought tears to my eyes for literally no reason! I wholeheartedly recommend this book as it really can change your entire viewpoint on the world and our day-to-day lives. 4 stars to Nicola Yoon’s, The Sun Is Also a Star. Brilliant.
13 people found this helpful
Report
Ninaminacat
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Well worth the read for adults of all ages
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 6, 2019
YA fiction can be extremely satisfying for older adults, especially when some aspects, be it character, emotions, setting, world building are explored in depth. One thing that drew me to this particular novel was that one of the protagonists, Daniel, is a Korean American. I...See more
YA fiction can be extremely satisfying for older adults, especially when some aspects, be it character, emotions, setting, world building are explored in depth. One thing that drew me to this particular novel was that one of the protagonists, Daniel, is a Korean American. I have read a few Korean novels in the last few years and thought that the New York setting would give a very different cultural feel, especially as he is a member of the first generation of his family to be born in the US. To add to the mix, the other main character is a Jamaican immigrant, a fact which I hoped would lead to some interesting dynamics. To a large extent I was correct. Although ''The Sun is also a Star'' is not another ''The Fault in Our Stars'' and I was initially concerned that it would nowhere near meet my expectations, as the characters of Natasha and Daniel were revealed simultaneously to each other and the reader, I came to empathize with them both (but especially Natasha, whose character is very well fleshed out) and started to care intensely about their fate both as individuals and as a couple. In addition to the love story, the issues of race, colour, a sense of belonging, and the internal struggle between pursuing one''s dreams and following the expectations of others are all explored at least partially, giving the novel some of the depth I was craving - and a greater breadth than I had anticipated, which was a bonus.
3 people found this helpful
Report
Miss K. Southern
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Such a clever layout and important message, but some will hate the gushy insta-love...
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 27, 2018
Despite going in with high expectations, I still found myself pleasantly surprised by just how much I enjoyed this book! Romance is not normally a genre I particularly enjoy, but I''ve been making an extra effort to give books like this more of a chance, especially if they...See more
Despite going in with high expectations, I still found myself pleasantly surprised by just how much I enjoyed this book! Romance is not normally a genre I particularly enjoy, but I''ve been making an extra effort to give books like this more of a chance, especially if they come very highly reviewed as this one did. Nicola Yoon has been on my radar for a while, so I was excited to finally give her work a try! The words on the pages felt as fresh and vibrant as the front cover, and it was really unique despite focussing one one of my least favourite types of relationship - insta-love. Yoon''s approach to this book was very unique. There were two main POVs, Daniel and Natasha, but there were still snippets of fact and other character POVs that kept the story flowing and provided a different perspective. I really liked the way this book was structured and the length of each chapter especially because it felt like a really quick read and stood out from others as well-written, contemporary and buzzing with both energy and intensity. Natasha and Daniel were really great characters, I liked the book''s focus on racism between minorities and immigration (Natasha is an illegal Jamaican immigrant about to be deported and Daniel, of Korean descent, is being forced to live the ''American dream'' by his parents who had it harder) which is something rarely covered in books. I have to say though, despite throwing in lots of other distractions along the way, the insta-love still made me eye roll just a teensy bit. Especially as Natasha was so dead-set against it! Some of the quotes in this book are clever and a little cute, but a fair few of them could be pretty vomit-inducing for most of the reading public. As the book was focussing on such serious issues, I really wanted to believe that this story could happen. But it struck me as . little too cringey to be feasible. Of COURSE Daniel is a poet (and boy, do we know it). Of COURSE he sees ''signs'' and ''fate'' in the most mundane of things. Of COURSE Natasha goes along with it and doesn''t report him for stalking her like that. Of COURSE love wins all, even though they have only known each other for a day! Yeah, it definitely felt like a marmite book to me, but it won me round!
6 people found this helpful
Report
Mrs. Lj Hart
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A brilliant beautiful story
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 10, 2021
I read Everything, Everything on Kindle about two years ago and loved it so much that I bought a physical copy so my daughters could enjoy it. Needless to say, I''ll be doing the same with The Sun is Also a Star. It seems as if the stars and fate align to bring Natasha and...See more
I read Everything, Everything on Kindle about two years ago and loved it so much that I bought a physical copy so my daughters could enjoy it. Needless to say, I''ll be doing the same with The Sun is Also a Star. It seems as if the stars and fate align to bring Natasha and Daniel together on the day Natasha and her family are due to be deported from America as illegal undocumented immigrants. Natasha has worked hard to carve a successful future for herself and just wants the same opportunities as her friends in the only country she''s known and which she calls home. Will she be able to get the help she needs to overcome the judge''s decision? Nicola Yoon creates characters so convincingly and just glues her readers to the page with what feels like effortless plotting. I felt as if Natasha and Daniel''s journey was one I travelled with them and I had my fingers crossed for the right outcome throughout. No spoilers. From a writer''s perspective, this book is written in a head hopping style, which the reader gets used to because it is a tool which is used consistently. Additionally, because the book largely only follows these two characters. I recommend buying this book too to see how this has worked in this instance, but not to try it yourself. Nicola Yoon is a particularly skilled author.
Report
See all reviews
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who viewed this item also viewed

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Pages with related products.

  • Books for 15 Year Old

The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon




Product information

The Sun sale Is outlet online sale Also a Star sale

The Sun sale Is outlet online sale Also a Star sale

The Sun sale Is outlet online sale Also a Star sale

The Sun sale Is outlet online sale Also a Star sale

The Sun sale Is outlet online sale Also a Star sale

The Sun sale Is outlet online sale Also a Star sale

The Sun sale Is outlet online sale Also a Star sale

The Sun sale Is outlet online sale Also a Star sale

The Sun sale Is outlet online sale Also a Star sale

The Sun sale Is outlet online sale Also a Star sale

The Sun sale Is outlet online sale Also a Star sale

The Sun sale Is outlet online sale Also a Star sale

The Sun sale Is outlet online sale Also a Star sale

The Sun sale Is outlet online sale Also a Star sale

The Sun sale Is outlet online sale Also a Star sale

The Sun sale Is outlet online sale Also a Star sale

The Sun sale Is outlet online sale Also a Star sale

The Sun sale Is outlet online sale Also a Star sale

The Sun sale Is outlet online sale Also a Star sale

The Sun sale Is outlet online sale Also a Star sale

The Sun sale Is outlet online sale Also a Star sale

The Sun sale Is outlet online sale Also a Star sale

The Sun sale Is outlet online sale Also a Star sale

The Sun sale Is outlet online sale Also a Star sale

The Sun sale Is outlet online sale Also a Star sale

The Sun sale Is outlet online sale Also a Star sale

The Sun sale Is outlet online sale Also a Star sale

The Sun sale Is outlet online sale Also a Star sale