The 2021 wholesale Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future online

The 2021 wholesale Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future online

The 2021 wholesale Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future online
The 2021 wholesale Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future online__below

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“A quintessential work of technological futurism.” – James Surowiecki, strategy + business, “Best Business Books 2017 – Innovation”

From one of our leading technology thinkers and writers, a guide through the twelve technological imperatives that will shape the next thirty years and transform our lives


Much of what will happen in the next thirty years is inevitable, driven by technological trends that are already in motion. In this fascinating, provocative new book, Kevin Kelly provides an optimistic road map for the future, showing how the coming changes in our lives—from virtual reality in the home to an on-demand economy to artificial intelligence embedded in everything we manufacture—can be understood as the result of a few long-term, accelerating forces. Kelly both describes these deep trends—interacting, cognifying, flowing, screening, accessing, sharing, filtering, remixing, tracking, and questioning—and demonstrates how they overlap and are codependent on one another. These larger forces will completely revolutionize the way we buy, work, learn, and communicate with each other. By understanding and embracing them, says Kelly, it will be easier for us to remain on top of the coming wave of changes and to arrange our day-to-day relationships with technology in ways that bring forth maximum benefits. Kelly’s bright, hopeful book will be indispensable to anyone who seeks guidance on where their business, industry, or life is heading—what to invent, where to work, in what to invest, how to better reach customers, and what to begin to put into place—as this new world emerges.

Review

“A quintessential work of technological futurism . . . what’s valuable about The Inevitable, from a business perspective, is less what it says about how to innovate, and more what it says about where to innovate.”  – James Surowiecki, strategy + business, “Best Business Books 2017 – Innovation”

"Anyone can claim to be a prophet, a fortune teller, or a futurist, and plenty of people do. What makes Kevin Kelly different is that he''s  right. In this book, you''re swept along by his clear prose and unassailable arguments until it finally hits you: The technological, cultural, and societal changes he’s foreseeing really are inevitable. It’s like having a crystal ball, only without the risk of shattering."
David Pogue, Yahoo Tech

"This book offers profound insight into what happens (soon!) when intelligence flows as easily into objects as electricity."
Chris Anderson, author of The Long Tail

“How will the future be made? Kevin Kelly argues that the sequence of events ensuing from technical innovation has its own momentum . . . and that our best strategy is to understand and embrace it. Whether you find this prospect wonderful or terrifying, you will want to read this extremely thought-provoking book.”
Brian Eno, musician and composer

"Kevin Kelly has been predicting our technological future with uncanny prescience for years. Now he''s given us a glimpse of how the next three decades will unfold with The Inevitable, a book jam-packed with insight, ideas, and optimism."
Ernest Cline, author of Ready Player One

 
"As exhilarating as the most outlandish science fiction novel, but based on very real trends. Kevin Kelly is the perfect tour guide for this life-changing future."
Mark Frauenfelder, Boing Boing

"Creating a fictional future is easy; Kevin Kelly makes a habit of doing the difficult by showing us where we''re actually going. The Inevitable is an eye-opening roadmap for what lies ahead. Science fiction is on its way to becoming science fact."  
Hugh Howey, author of Wool

“Automatic must-read.”                             
—Marc Andreessen, co-founder Andreessen Horowitz

About the Author

Kevin Kelly helped launch Wired magazine and was its executive editor for its first seven years. He has written for The New York Times, The Economist, Science, Time, and The Wall Street Journal among many other publications. His previous books include Out of Control, New Rules for the New Economy, Cool Tools, and What Technology Wants. Currently Senior Maverick at Wired, Kelly lives in Pacifica, California.

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4.5 out of 54.5 out of 5
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Top reviews from the United States

Lyn Hill
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Preview the world to come
Reviewed in the United States on September 2, 2016
This book is well researched, well written and exciting to read.
Where the topic is life thirty years hence, it was amazing to me
how much change has already occurred. I''m almost 90, and won''t
see that future, but it sure was fun to visualize it.
90 people found this helpful
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fitzalling
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Worthwhile - the author has had a 30 year ringside seat watching technology change
Reviewed in the United States on September 18, 2018
When I saw that Mr. Kelly was a founder of the magazine Wired, I knew that I wanted to read this book. I admire Wired because I think it looks carefully at technology and thinks for itself, which I find admirable. So, what does the book say? The author looks back... See more
When I saw that Mr. Kelly was a founder of the magazine Wired, I knew that I wanted to read this book. I admire Wired because I think it looks carefully at technology and thinks for itself, which I find admirable. So, what does the book say?

The author looks back over the 30 years that he''s had his ringside seat, considers what he''s seen and predicted over that 30 years and then he projects forward over the next 30 years to see where he thinks technology will take us. He clearly states that he considers the positive aspects of future change, not the negative aspects. The author predicts that certain technological trends or impulses are inevitable, not specific outcomes. So, don''t expect to see predictions of a world free of war or cures for all cancers, that''s not what he views as the what he terms "bias" of technological change. He identifies 12 of these biases and discusses how they have played out over the 30 years that he''s been observing them and how he thinks they''ll evolve over the next 30 years. For instance, he views telephony as inevitable, but the iPhone was not. The internet was inevitable, but the specific form of internet that we presently have was not.

I''ll touch on a few of the 12 and encourage you to read the book for the full observations. Flowing - the book describes the internet as the world''s largest copying machine. Information in many forms is copied and distributed. usually for free. The industrial revolution brought analog copies of information such as music. These copies were exact and cheap. The internet brings digital music - exact and free. This affects value propositions and law, which causes change. He considers how this change and looks for responses to this change. Trust may become even more valuable.

Screening - where once we may have been people who read books and did things "by the book," the author argues that we are now people of the screen (the computer screen). People of the Screen live "in a world of constant flux." Paperback at pg. 88. As he says, "truth is not delivered by authors and authorities, but is assembled in real time piece by piece by the audience themselves." Pg. 88. I''ll let you decide how this may be playing out in society today.

Questioning - Wikipedia was a great shock to the author. When Wikipedia began, Mr. Kelly could not believe that it would be anything other than an abject failure. As he says, "I knew from my own 20-year experience that you could not rely upon what you read from a random stranger.... I believed that an aggregation of random contributions would be a total mess" Pg. 269. The ability to many people to self-organize through the internet a reasonably coherent body of information was eye opening. "I am looking forward to having my mind changed a lot in the coming years." Pg. 274.

The author describes "becoming, cognifying, flowing, screening, accessing, sharing, filtering, remixing,interacting, tracking, questioning, and beginning" as areas in which change is inevitable. In all of these I find the "tracking" most troubling. But, like the author, with the passage of time, I may find my mind changed a lot.

I encourage you to read the book and see if it challenges your mind.
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Tero
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A rather "soft" review of technology and how it affects your life
Reviewed in the United States on January 15, 2021
On page 170 Kevin Kelly gets to echo chambers. We are currently experiencing a bit of a shake up with righ-wingers and libertarians, the militant type, having no place to scream their loss of a leader who expressed the outrage they had for the left, or even the mainstream... See more
On page 170 Kevin Kelly gets to echo chambers. We are currently experiencing a bit of a shake up with righ-wingers and libertarians, the militant type, having no place to scream their loss of a leader who expressed the outrage they had for the left, or even the mainstream of politics.

This sort of negative stuff about the Internet is mainly left out of the book. The chapters are well thought out, so you will find this sort of tracking by those who track (gov''t et al) listed in the chapter titled Tracking.

Technology has reached most of the world, though we in the developed world have a much bigger quantity available to us. The farmer in India, as mentioned in the book, may not have running water, but he does have a cell phone.

Crowd sourcing in promoted in the book, as is free software. The communities in the world are connected and are creating a lot of this stuff you borrow from the internet. You do not own much of it, you share.

Examples of crowd sourcing and everyday life are listed, connecting the on-line world to the real world. We are experiencing some of it as we pick up groceries during the pandemic, after ordering it on line. I hope my vaccination will be similarly organized, as we drive though to get vaccinated. If the pandemic drags on, band will start giving concerts on line, with you donating a few dollars of your choosing to hear the concert. Some bands already give out free music, with you deciding what

I said the book is light on the hardware part. It explain what is possible, how servers are connected to give you a streaming feed without interruption. But little is explained about technical side and its vulnerabilities. As independent as we are, we are still dependent on internet providers and our phone provider to keep in touch with the world.

I use an iPhone and I use Windows computers. I still pay for those. I am even stuck using them, as I cannot stand how the cursor and typing works on Android devices. So the free stuff in the book may or may not arrive. We may even see the lower income people lose some services as the rest of us keep paying for our instant news and entertainment.

The future is not really mapped out that well in the book. The fact that you could carry all the music ever produced in your pocket 20 years later may be true (he says to keep it in the cloud) but other aspects of the real world will rule what we get in ten years. You would need an economist as well as a biologist to flesh out the physical world a little better. What happens to homelessness, food supply and all that?

Still, it did help for him to focus on the positive. it will be necessary to just go along with these changes. Otherwise you will be stuck in some resistance echo chamber and will not be able to keep up with the the world and be part of it, physical and virtual.
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DES
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
"Technological life in the future will be a series of endless upgrades.
Reviewed in the United States on October 3, 2020
Writing about the future is better than writing about the past. We rarely hold predictions accountable for accuracy. In fact, this book begins with a discussion of how wrong everyone was in making predictions of how the Internet would develop. And yet, author Kevin Kelly... See more
Writing about the future is better than writing about the past. We rarely hold predictions accountable for accuracy. In fact, this book begins with a discussion of how wrong everyone was in making predictions of how the Internet would develop. And yet, author Kevin Kelly is trying to predict how life will be in 2046 and beyond.

“The Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future” is loosely based on looking at past technological developments and projecting them into the future. Some of them are pretty bland, “This is not a race against the machines. If we race against them, we lose. This is a race with the machines. You’ll be paid in the future based on how well you work with robots.”

One of Kelly’s main themes is that technology evolves on its own and the book ends with a somewhat bizarre prediction of how knowledge will be amassed.

I was expecting more from this book. I was hoping that his 10 forces would be better grounded in past developments rather than predictions from the author’s imagination.
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edsetiadi
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The future is going to be incredible
Reviewed in the United States on January 29, 2021
This is a very exciting book to read, with all the possibilities of our future technology all laid out by Kevin Kelly, the co-founding editor of Wired magazine, whom sees the future with a glass half full approach. While many smart people from Stephen Hawking to... See more
This is a very exciting book to read, with all the possibilities of our future technology all laid out by Kevin Kelly, the co-founding editor of Wired magazine, whom sees the future with a glass half full approach.

While many smart people from Stephen Hawking to Elon Musk have expressed their concerns over the rise of Artificial Intelligence (AI) that can overtake humans as the dominant force on Earth, Kelly argues that AI can actually help us become better at we do, whether it’s to become a better doctor, better pilots, better judges, even better teachers. Because the most crucial thing about thinking machines is that they will think differently,  just like AI will drive a car differently than our easily distracted minds or sees the mystery of the Dark Matter from completely different angles.

Moreover, Kelly then elaborates that “In the real world—even in the space of powerful minds—trade-offs rule. One mind cannot do all mindful things perfectly well. A particular species of mind will be better in certain dimensions, but at a cost of lesser abilities in other dimensions.” This limitation also applies in AI, thus would then prevent them to become our dark overlords.

For example, the AI that diagnose our illness will have completely different capabilities than the ones that guide a self-driving truck, the one that can evaluate our mortgages aren’t capable of safeguarding our houses, while the AI that can predict our weather pattern will have a different intelligence than the ones that can manufacture clothings.

Kelly then list 25 possible types of AI’s “new minds” that are superior than ours but would be very beneficial for us humans without the risk of overpowering us. And these variations are just so powerful, an absolute goldmine.

And that, in essence, is the bedrock argument of this book, which he then proceeded to discuss every possible technicalities in many areas of industries, covering every single future possibilities in every aspects of life, including the extend of the technology that could make the movie Minority Report a possibility, where the movie describe a not-so-distant future where surveillance are used to arrest criminals before they commit a crime.

The book also explains the progress that are already happening in the world, such as the technology and concept behind the likes of Uber, AirBnb, Spotify, Netflix, Kindle, Wikipedia, Tesla, WeChat, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, among many others, to Torrent, Second Life, Nest smart thermostat, wearables such as Apple Watch, Bell’s bodycam, until cloud services, Bitcoin, “Big Data”, and Virtual Reality.

All in all, the book state that this is just the beginning of the internet era, and that we need to create AIs that can think differently for specific tasks which would immensely help us in progressing as a society. And it has so far proven right, as the book was written in 2016 and today in 2021 a lot of what Kelly had said are already happening, for better and for worse.

Immensely enlightening book, easily becomes one of my top favourites, very highly recommended.
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Eliot Peper
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The most interesting nonfiction book I’ve read about the future in a long time
Reviewed in the United States on July 25, 2016
The most interesting nonfiction book I’ve read about the future in a long time. I constantly found myself rereading passages and marking pages to come back to later. Kevin has been an enthusiastic observer of both the human condition and the state of technology for decades... See more
The most interesting nonfiction book I’ve read about the future in a long time. I constantly found myself rereading passages and marking pages to come back to later. Kevin has been an enthusiastic observer of both the human condition and the state of technology for decades as a cofounder of Wired, and his insights are deep, provocative, and wide ranging. In his own words, “When answers become cheap, good questions become more difficult and therefore more valuable.” The Inevitable raises many important questions that will shape the next few decades.
17 people found this helpful
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Alex J. Hughes
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great exercise in reminding yourself to take your thinking to the next level
Reviewed in the United States on April 12, 2018
Kelly is a great teacher when it comes to helping others think beyond the realm of current possibilities. I often find myself fighting the inertia of the way things currently are, instead of looking at the inevitable trends and determining what''s next. The specific forces... See more
Kelly is a great teacher when it comes to helping others think beyond the realm of current possibilities. I often find myself fighting the inertia of the way things currently are, instead of looking at the inevitable trends and determining what''s next. The specific forces he outlines become a bit repetitive, as there is significant overlap to each. But as a whole, it''s a great exercise in reminding yourself to take your thinking to the next level. Kelly is also refreshingly optimistic about the future of technology. He suggests that while we have little control over the inevitable technological forces on the horizon, we do have influence over their character and how symmetrical those relationships end up being.
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Dennis Muzza
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Internet elder''s crystal ball for the next 30 years
Reviewed in the United States on January 4, 2017
Kevin Kelly is at it again with this book that looks at what the future has for us in the next 30 years, with each of the 12 forces described being a broad theme (i.e. Sharing, Screening, Accessing, etc.) that we can easily recognize today as happening but he explains in a... See more
Kevin Kelly is at it again with this book that looks at what the future has for us in the next 30 years, with each of the 12 forces described being a broad theme (i.e. Sharing, Screening, Accessing, etc.) that we can easily recognize today as happening but he explains in a broader context and outlines where it will take us. Unlike other authors, who only look forward and disregard what has been said before, Kelly was actually a pioneer of the Internet when it was at its embryonic stage in the 1980s and reflects on how wrong the 20-30 year predictions from that time were, including his own. So when, after all that he has seen, when seemingly all the valuable Internet real estate has been taken, he makes the bold statement at the end of the first chapter that "Right now, today, in 2016, is the best time to start up...This is the moment that folks in the future will look back at and say ''Oh, to have been alive back then''", he grabs and holds your attention for the rest of the book.

This is a book that whose ideas are meant to be slowly pondered on, not to be gobbled up quickly. As in his previous works there is an underlying sense that technology has a will of its own, it wants to go in a certain direction which we would do well to align with. What I found most illustrative were the scenarios at the end of each chapter where he shows what life in the future looks like after the technological force described in it has had enough time to play out, a positive take on what popular TV shows like Black Mirror paint in a very dark way.

The optimism that pervades the book requires the reader to take the long view, to look beyond the present state. At a time when we are bombarded with news stories about the disappearance of privacy, the surveillance state, cyberwarfare, and the automation of millions of jobs out of existence Kelly can come across as a hopeless Pollyanna, and when he claims that "propaganda is less effective in a world of screens, because while misinformation travels as fast as electrons corrections do too" calling this naive is too soft a word after a US election where fake news played a big role and traditional fact checking could not penetrate the social media bubbles we now live in. But like Kelly says when describing the Becoming force, technology is still evolving and just because we don''t have a solution today to these problems doesn''t mean that they will not eventually arise after these forces have run their course. With that confidence we can best appreciate what Kelly has to say.
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Top reviews from other countries

nevillek
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great book, good stories, a few missed opportunities.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 23, 2016
Kevin Kelly has form - he''s been writing about digital technology and its likely impact for around 30 years, and he''s often seen new things emerge long before anyone else. "The inevitable" is set around 12 themes, and for each theme, Kelly writes about both the past...See more
Kevin Kelly has form - he''s been writing about digital technology and its likely impact for around 30 years, and he''s often seen new things emerge long before anyone else. "The inevitable" is set around 12 themes, and for each theme, Kelly writes about both the past and the present with lucidity, and then extrapolates to the future. He includes little pastiches of what life will be like in 20 years when a particular technology trend has progressed to be almost unrecognizable from today''s perspective. The book is clear, well-organized and an entertaining read. It rattles along at a decent pace, and the overall tone is positive. I have some minor quibbles about the editing - there are a few more typos than I''d like. I felt two things were missing, though. Firstly, while digital advances have brought undoubted benefits, Kelly doesn''t spend enough time on the challenges. Sure, being able to collect lots of information on ourselves, others and our environments is great - but this also creates privacy challenges, and creates new opportunities for those who would harm us. Kelly doesn''t look at these aspects in any detail. The other missed opportunity is that Kelly''s outlook is very "middle-class American" - nearly all the anecdotes, pastiches and comparators are from the perspective of a relatively affluent, relatively comfortable person living in a stable, safe environment. Digital technology arguably will affect people in developing countries much more - and I didn''t see much from Kelly on this.
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Mr. Cliff P. Harris
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Interesting, but the author lives in a tech elite bubble.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 30, 2016
Its an interesting read, but nothing ground-breaking. The real problem is that its written entirely in the bubble of a silicon valley member of the tech elite. So its INEVITABLE that we will have cheaper technology, more sensors, fastyer communications, more data. There is...See more
Its an interesting read, but nothing ground-breaking. The real problem is that its written entirely in the bubble of a silicon valley member of the tech elite. So its INEVITABLE that we will have cheaper technology, more sensors, fastyer communications, more data. There is apparently no downside or no limit. This takes zero consideration of environmental and economic factors. Increasing inequality, resource constraints and climate change mean that the tech-paradise the author suggests is inevitable may be inevitable for a tiny tiny percentage of the worlds population. An interesting book if you want to know the future of palo alto, but I''d recommend al gores ''the future'' if you want a more global and less rose-tinted view of real future developments.
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Chase Richards
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Disappointing in scope and delivery
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 9, 2017
I found that this book fell short of expectations, and didn''t really deliver anything besides some idle musings. Maybe I expected too much, but I was hoping for some hard-edged looks at current technologies that were emerging, and threatening to disrupt how we live, work,...See more
I found that this book fell short of expectations, and didn''t really deliver anything besides some idle musings. Maybe I expected too much, but I was hoping for some hard-edged looks at current technologies that were emerging, and threatening to disrupt how we live, work, and consume. Instead, the ideas are a bit wishy-washy. He struggles to force his vague "technological forces" into a bizarre "doing, sharing, becoming, etc" framework that suits some things but not others. The author also seems to put a vaguely futuristic spin on current technologies and behaviours within the current paradigm, without offering anything truly novel. While I was hoping for a glimpse into the future, really what I found was a very opinion-based look at what''s happening today. This is coloured by pseudo-anthropological language that masks a very superficial understanding and treatment of the technologies discussed. The book struggled to hold my attention until the end but I persevered. Unfortunately, the effort wasn''t very rewarding.
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Jillian Florence
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Inevitable - really? The future is spam.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 9, 2020
The author starts by talking about how wrong all future predictions were from the early internet, as well as how difficult it is to predict. So how can he predict life in 2046? Who want to just accept that every building to be covered in personalised Ads? This certainly...See more
The author starts by talking about how wrong all future predictions were from the early internet, as well as how difficult it is to predict. So how can he predict life in 2046? Who want to just accept that every building to be covered in personalised Ads? This certainly isn''t a desire future of any sane person. This is not inevitable because anyone who sees ad screens everywhere will implode into madness or rage. Already cities are become chavified with 100s of screens in buildings and pubs. This need stopping now. Ads will pay you to watch them? Er no. I''ll rather crowdfund an ad repellent. See an Ad - broadcast their competitors instead before hacking the ad billboards to display beautiful screens of nature or amazing architecture. Help shape your future. Help those who work in video advertising to get a life. Get a hobby! Afterall, you''re just an Adobe subscriber.
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Czechboy
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
1 for future results of tech, 5 for present analysis
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 10, 2017
While I see the future as Charlton Heston running through a starving, overpopulated city waving a big gun around shouting ''Soylent Green is people,'' Kelly thinks of it as some coming together of everything and everyone. His notion that we will all be online informing...See more
While I see the future as Charlton Heston running through a starving, overpopulated city waving a big gun around shouting ''Soylent Green is people,'' Kelly thinks of it as some coming together of everything and everyone. His notion that we will all be online informing ourselves all of the time seems awful to me. I think there will be a unabomber type rejection of tech as people desire a return to privacy and less intrusion into there lives. AI for him means we will all be baking artisan bread for each other, for me it means unemployment and destruction. Of course for him tech will mean he remains part of the elite, for me it means a free fall into modern slavery. Just my ten bob''s worth. Good book really let down by his gushing enthusiasm for, well, for everything that he thinks tech will bring.
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The 2021 wholesale Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future online

The 2021 wholesale Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future online

The 2021 wholesale Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future online

The 2021 wholesale Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future online

The 2021 wholesale Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future online

The 2021 wholesale Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future online

The 2021 wholesale Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future online

The 2021 wholesale Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future online

The 2021 wholesale Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future online

The 2021 wholesale Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future online

The 2021 wholesale Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future online

The 2021 wholesale Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future online

The 2021 wholesale Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future online

The 2021 wholesale Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future online

The 2021 wholesale Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future online

The 2021 wholesale Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future online

The 2021 wholesale Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future online

The 2021 wholesale Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future online

The 2021 wholesale Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future online

The 2021 wholesale Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future online

The 2021 wholesale Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future online

The 2021 wholesale Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future online

The 2021 wholesale Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future online

The 2021 wholesale Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future online

The 2021 wholesale Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future online

The 2021 wholesale Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future online

The 2021 wholesale Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future online

The 2021 wholesale Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future online

The 2021 wholesale Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future online