Morning outlet sale Star (Red discount Rising Series) online

Morning outlet sale Star (Red discount Rising Series) online

Morning outlet sale Star (Red discount Rising Series) online

Description

Product Description

#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • Red Rising thrilled readers and announced the presence of a talented new author. Golden Son changed the game and took the story of Darrow to the next level. Now comes the exhilarating next chapter in the Red Rising Saga: Morning Star.

ITW THRILLER AWARD FINALIST • “[Brown’s] achievement is in creating an uncomfortably familiar world of flaw, fear, and promise.”—Entertainment Weekly

Darrow would have lived in peace, but his enemies brought him war. The Gold overlords demanded his obedience, hanged his wife, and enslaved his people. But Darrow is determined to fight back. Risking everything to transform himself and breach Gold society, Darrow has battled to survive the cutthroat rivalries that breed Society’s mightiest warriors, climbed the ranks, and waited patiently to unleash the revolution that will tear the hierarchy apart from within.

Finally, the time has come.

But devotion to honor and hunger for vengeance run deep on both sides. Darrow and his comrades-in-arms face powerful enemies without scruple or mercy. Among them are some Darrow once considered friends. To win, Darrow will need to inspire those shackled in darkness to break their chains, unmake the world their cruel masters have built, and claim a destiny too long denied—and too glorious to surrender.

Praise for Morning Star

“There is no one writing today who does shameless, Michael Bay–style action set pieces the way Brown does. The battle scenes are kinetic, bloody, breathless, crazy. Everything is on fire all the time.” —NPR

Morning Star is this trilogy’s Return of the Jedi. . . . The impactful battles that make up most of Morning Star are damn near operatic. . . . It absolutely satisfies.” Tordotcom

“Excellent . . . Brown’s vivid, first-person prose puts the reader right at the forefront of impassioned speeches, broken families, and engaging battle scenes . . . as this interstellar civil war comes to a most satisfying conclusion.” Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“A page-turning epic filled with twists and turns . . . The conclusion to Brown’s saga is simply stellar.” Booklist (starred review)

Don’t miss any of Pierce Brown’s Red Rising Saga:

RED RISING • GOLDEN SON • MORNING STAR • IRON GOLD • DARK AGE

Review

“You could call [Pierce] Brown science fiction’s best-kept secret. In Morning Star, the trilogy’s devastating and inspiring final chapter, . . . he flirts with volume, oscillating between thundering space escapes and hushed, tense parleys between rivals, where the cinematic dialogue oozes such specificity and suspense you could almost hear a pin drop between pages. His achievement is in creating an uncomfortably familiar world of flaw, fear, and promise.” Entertainment Weekly

“There is no one writing today who does shameless, Michael Bay–style action set pieces the way Brown does. The battle scenes are kinetic, bloody, breathless, crazy. Everything is on fire all the time.” —NPR
 
Morning Star is this trilogy’s Return of the Jedi. . . . The impactful battles that make up most of Morning Star are damn near operatic. . . . It absolutely satisfies.” Tordotcom
 
“Excellent . . . Brown’s vivid, first-person prose puts the reader right at the forefront of impassioned speeches, broken families, and engaging battle scenes . . . as this interstellar civil war comes to a most satisfying conclusion.” Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“A page-turning epic filled with twists and turns . . . The conclusion to Brown’s saga is simply stellar.” Booklist (starred review)

“Multilayered and seething with characters who exist in a shadow world between history and myth, much as in Frank Herbert’s Dune . . . an ambitious and satisfying conclusion to a monumental saga.” Kirkus Reviews

About the Author

Pierce Brown is the #1  New York Times bestselling author of  Red Rising, Golden Son, Morning Star, Iron Gold, and  Dark Age. His work has been published in thirty-three languages and thirty-five territories. He lives in Los Angeles, where he is at work on his next novel.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

1

Only the Dark

Deep in darkness, far from warmth and sun and moons, I lie, quiet as the stone that surrounds me, imprisoning my hunched body in a dreadful womb. I cannot stand. Cannot stretch. I can only curl in a ball, a withered fossil of the man that was. Hands cuffed behind my back. Naked on cold rock.

All alone with the dark.

It seems months, years, millennia since my knees have unbent, since my spine has straightened from its crooked pose. The ache is madness. My joints fuse like rusted iron. How much time has passed since I saw my Golden friends bleeding out into the grass? Since I felt gentle Roque kiss my cheek as he broke my heart?

Time is no river.

Not here.

In this tomb, time is the stone. It is the darkness, permanent and unyielding, its only measure the twin pendulums of life—­breath and the beating of my heart.

In. Buh . . . bump. Buh . . . bump.

Out. Buh . . . bump. Buh . . . bump.

In. Buh . . . bump. Buh . . . bump.

And forever it repeats. Until . . . Until when? Until I die of old age? Until I crush my skull against the stone? Until I gnaw out the tubes the Yellows threaded into my lower gut to force nutrients in and wastes out?

Or until you go mad?

“No.” I grind my teeth.

Yessssss.

“It’s only the dark.” I breathe in. Calm myself. Touch the walls in my soothing pattern. Back, fingers, tailbone, heels, toes, knees, head. Repeat. A dozen times. A hundred. Why not be sure? Make it a thousand.

Yes. I’m alone.

I would have thought there to be worse fates than this, but now I know there are none. Man is no island. We need those who love us. We need those who hate us. We need others to tether us to life, to give us a reason to live, to feel. All I have is the darkness. Sometimes I scream. Sometimes I laugh during the night, during the day. Who knows now? I laugh to pass the time, to exhaust the calories the Jackal gives me and make my body shiver into sleep.

I weep too. I hum. I whistle.

I listen to voices above. Coming to me from the endless sea of darkness. And attending them is the maddening clatter of chains and bones, vibrating through my prison walls. All so close, yet a thousand kilometers away, as if a whole world existed just beyond the darkness and I cannot see it, cannot touch it, taste it, feel it, or pierce that veil to belong to the world once again. I am imprisoned in solitude.

I hear the voices now. The chains and bones trickling through my prison.

Are the voices mine?

I laugh at the idea.

I curse.

I plot. Kill.

Slaughter. Gouge. Rip. Burn.

I beg. I hallucinate. I bargain.

I whimper prayers to Eo, happy she was spared a fate like this.

She’s not listening.

I sing childhood ballads and recite Dying Earth, The Lamplighter, the Ramayana, The Odyssey in Greek and Latin, then in the lost languages of Arabic, English, Chinese, and German, pulling from memories of dataDrops Matteo gave me when I was barely more than a boy. Seeking strength from the wayward Argive who only wished to find his way home.

You forget what he did.

Odysseus was a hero. He broke the walls of Troy with his wooden horse. Like I broke the Bellona armies in the Iron Rain over Mars.

And then . . .

“No,” I snap. “Quiet.”

. . . men entered Troy. Found mothers. Found children. Guess what they did?

“Shut up!”

You know what they did. Bone. Sweat. Flesh. Ash. Weeping. Blood.

The darkness cackles with glee.

Reaper, Reaper, Reaper . . . All deeds that last are painted in blood.

Am I asleep? Am I awake? I’ve lost my way. Everything bleeding together, drowning me in visions and whispers and sounds. Again and again I jerk Eo’s fragile little ankles. Break Julian’s face. Hear Pax and Quinn and Tactus and Lorn and Victra sigh their last. So much pain. And for what? To fail my wife. To fail my people.

And fail Ares. Fail your friends.

How many are even left?

Sevro? Ragnar?

Mustang?

Mustang. What if she knows you’re here . . . What if she doesn’t care .  . . And why would she? You who betrayed. You who lied. You who used her mind. Her body. Her blood. You showed her your true face and she ran. What if it was her? What if she betrayed you? Could you love her then?

“Shut up!” I scream at myself, at the darkness.

Don’t think of her. Don’t think of her.

Why ever not? You miss her.

A vision of her is spawned in the darkness like so many before it—­a girl riding away from me across a field of green, twisting in her saddle and laughing for me to follow. Hair rippling as would summer hay fluttering from a farmer’s wagon.

You crave her. You love her. The Golden girl. Forget that Red bitch.

“No.” I slam my head against the wall. “It’s only the dark,” I whisper. Only the dark playing tricks on my mind. But still I try to forget Mustang, Eo. There is no world beyond this place. I cannot miss what does not exist.

Warm blood trickles down my forehead from old scabs, now freshly broken. It drips off my nose. I extend my tongue, probing the cold stone till I find the drops. Savor the salt, the Martian iron. Slowly. Slowly. Let the novelty of sensation last. Let the flavor linger and remind me I am a man. A Red of Lykos. A Helldiver.

No. You are not. You are nothing. Your wife abandoned you and stole your child. Your whore turned from you. You were not good enough. You were too proud. Too stupid. Too wicked. Now, you are forgotten.

Am I?

When last I saw the Golden girl, I was on my knees beside Ragnar in the tunnels of Lykos, asking Mustang to betray her own people and live for more. I knew that if she chose to join us, Eo’s dream would blossom. A better world was at our fingertips. Instead, she left. Could she forget me? Has her love for me left her?

She only loved your mask.

“It’s only the dark. Only the dark. Only the dark,” I mumble faster and faster.

I should not be here.

I should be dead. After the death of Lorn, I was to be given to Octavia so her Carvers could dissect me to discover the secrets of how I became Gold. To see if there could be others like me. But the Jackal made a bargain. Kept me for his own. He tortured me in his Attica estate, asking about the Sons of Ares, about Lykos and my family. Never telling me how he discovered my secret. I begged him to end my life.

In the end, he gave me stone.

“When all is lost, honor demands death,” Roque once told me. “It is a noble end.” But what would a rich poet know of death? The poor know death. Slaves know death. But even as I yearn for it, I fear it. Because the more I see of this cruel world, the less I believe it ends in some pleasant fiction.

The Vale is not real.

It’s a lie told by mothers and fathers to give their starving children a reason for the horror. There is no reason. Eo is gone. She never watched me fight for her dream. She did not care what fate I made at the Institute or if I loved Mustang, because the day she died, she became nothing. There is nothing but this world. It is our beginning and our end. Our one chance at joy before the dark.

Yes. But you don’t have to end. You can escape this place, the darkness whispers to me. Say the words. Say them. You know the way.

It is right. I do.

“All you must say is ‘I am broken,’ and this will all end,” the Jackal said long ago, before he lowered me into this hell. “I will put you in a lovely estate for the rest of your days and send you warm, beautiful Pinks and food enough to make you fatter than the Ash Lord. But the words carry a price.”

Worth it. Save yourself. No one else will.

“That price, dear Reaper, is your family.”

The family he seized from Lykos with his lurchers and now keeps in his prison in the bowels of his Attica fortress. Never letting me see them. Never letting me tell them I love them, and that I’m sorry I was not strong enough to protect them.

“I will feed them to the prisoners of this fortress,” he said. “These men and women you think should rule instead of Gold. Once you see the animal in man, you will know that I am right and you are wrong. Gold must rule.”

Let them go, the darkness says. The sacrifice is practical. It is wise.

“No . . . I won’t . . .”

Your mother would want you to live.

Not at that price.

What man could grasp a mother’s love? Live. For her. For Eo.

Could she want that? Is the darkness right? After all, I’m important. Eo said so. Ares said so; he chose me. Me of all the Reds. I can break the chains. I can live for more. It’s not selfish for me to escape this prison. In the grand scheme of things, it is selfless.

Yes. Selfless, really . . .

Mother would beg me to make this sacrifice. Kieran would understand. So would my sister. I can save our people. Eo’s dream must be made real, no matter the cost. It’s my responsibility to persevere. It is my right.

Say the words.

I slam my head into the stone and scream at the darkness to go away. It cannot trick me. It cannot break me.

Didn’t you know? All men break.

Its high cackle mocks me, stretching forever.

And I know it is right. All men break. I did already under his torture. I told him that I was from Lykos. Where he could find my family. But there is a way out, to honor what I am. What Eo loved. To silence the voices.

“Roque, you were right,” I whisper. “You were right.” I just want to be home. To be gone from here. But I can’t have that. All that’s left, the only honorable path for me, is death. Before I betray even more of who I am.

Death is the way out.

Don’t be a fool. Stop. Stop.

I lurch my head forward into the wall harder than before. Not to punish, but to kill. To end myself. If there is no pleasant end to this world, then nothingness will suffice. But if there is a Vale beyond this plane, I will find it. I’m coming, Eo. At last, I am on my way. “I love you.”

No. No. No. No. No.

I crash my skull again into stone. Heat pours down my face. Sparks of pain dance in the black. The darkness wails at me, but I do not stop.

If this is the end, I will rage toward it.

But as I pull back my head to deliver one last great blow, existence groans. Rumbling like an earthquake. Not the darkness. Something beyond. Something in the stone itself, growing louder and deeper above me, till the darkness cracks and a blazing sword of light slashes down.

Product information

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Videos

Help others learn more about this product by uploading a video!
Upload video
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

More items to explore

Customer reviews

4.8 out of 54.8 out of 5
6,000 global ratings

Reviews with images

Top reviews from the United States

Kindle Customer
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Does not live up to the first two books in the series.
Reviewed in the United States on June 1, 2018
The first two books in this series were very good - five stars each. This book, however, was way longer than it should have been, and much less satisfying. In the first book, the hero (Darrow) does the unthinkable, rising from his lowest-caste status as a Red to... See more
The first two books in this series were very good - five stars each. This book, however, was way longer than it should have been, and much less satisfying.

In the first book, the hero (Darrow) does the unthinkable, rising from his lowest-caste status as a Red to the top shelf Gold. In the second book he meets people and wreaks havoc with the Society, which he aims to destroy. This book is very different from the others. It follows Darrow as he builds an army of loyalists and ships, and meets new and old people, some friendly, some not. At the beginning he finds himself imprisoned by his one-time (and some-time) friends, and as the book progresses he recruits allies to his cause. Along the way he runs repeatedly into enemies who have betrayed him over and over. Finally, at the very end, he seems to win, but suddenly loses, yet somehow emerges victorious.

I think the story could be good, and it sort of wraps up what the hero set out to do in the first book, although with voluminous loose ends. (I assume books four through six will get the situation straightened out.) But all throughout there is so much unbelievable crap, like in a bad super spy thriller. People get cut to shreds yet suddenly win the fight. People do things that should get them killed, but amazingly live to fight again. (I REALLY got tired of ''Aja'' popping up everywhere.) Darrow keeps trusting people he knows he shouldn''t, and keeps paying the price. Attacks overcome unbelievable odds only to be stymied by some inconsistent little detail.

As in the previous book, Darrow keeps falling into apparently unwinnable situations but magically gets away. The worst of these episodes comes at the end of the book, when he attains a major victory over a main enemy. The author leads us to believe that the situation goes south, the good guys die, and the annoyingly recurrent, really bad people are seconds from victory. He even tells us what Darrow is thinking about - how he messed up and lost the war. Except that''s not what Darrow is thinking. He does something unforeseen and saves the day. We actually get lied to. Surprises and strange turns are what make books good, but to be jerked around like this doesn''t make readers happy. It seems like the ending was given a lot of twists, turns, and action to revive an otherwise slow moving sequel to the first two books, but really it just misleads and annoys the reader. After this treatment, it think it will be a long while before I consider starting book four.

I am not a fan of run-on sentences. They can be used to great effect in the right situations, but this book is fraught with them, to the point that you find yourself tripping over the writing itself, wondering if you missed something. It''s irritating, and worse than in the previous books.

And finally, the author should really learn the difference between "till" and "until". It''s not that difficult.

Did I like this book? Not especially. I had to read it because it was the next in the series. Will I read the next one? I don''t know.
32 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Chandler Haun
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The best ending I could have hoped for!
Reviewed in the United States on March 30, 2017
SPOILERS ARE POSSIBLE. PROCEED WITH CAUTION. This book was the best conclusion I could have hoped for in regards to this series. My heart broke over and over (as per the norm for Pierce Brown), and then at the end it was put back together again. I am so in love... See more
SPOILERS ARE POSSIBLE. PROCEED WITH CAUTION.

This book was the best conclusion I could have hoped for in regards to this series. My heart broke over and over (as per the norm for Pierce Brown), and then at the end it was put back together again. I am so in love with this series, I’ve been recommending it to everyone.

I’m not sure if I mentioned it before or not, but I started this series on a couple of my friends’ recommendations. They told me just enough to keep me hooked, but also just enough to make me terrified to finish the book. I’m so glad they got me started on it, though. This review, as much as I would like for it to be only about Morning Star, is probably going to focus more on the series as whole. I can’t write a full review without spoiling everything.

Brown’s world is one of the most complex I’ve ever seen; from the caste system down to each relationship that Darrow has with the other characters. Every one of the characters is so dynamic, you can’t help but love every single one of them, even when a few betray Darrow.

Let’s talk about Darrow for a second. He is flawed, but his flaws are what make him such a good character. He tries to be noble and honorable, but he is selfish and cocky and he has a bad habit of betraying his friends. Darrow is not really a character that we fall in love with, despite everyone around him falling in love with him. We do, however, fall in love with his story and his world. It’s full of awful, terrible things, but it’s world where humans have pioneered into space. It’s a world with crazy technological advancements and the ability to create in ways that we cannot yet create. But, it’s broken, so we want to see it fixed.

I loved seeing Darrow’s transformation. I especially enjoy how his view of Eo changes over the course of the books. In the beginning, she’s perfection in his eyes. He spends the whole of Red Rising mourning her, but by the time we hit Golden Son Darrow starts to realize that his life with Eo wasn’t everything he thought it was. By the end of Morning Star, it’s plain to Darrow that he’s fighting for Eo’s dream, but not really for Eo anymore. Of course he still mourns her death, as he likely always will, but he realizes there’s more to his fight.

Though Darrow is our MC, Sevro is my favorite character. He’s obnoxious, brilliant, and disgusting. He’s comic relief to the extreme, Darrow’s foil, and an overall fantastic character. He’s described as short and ugly, callsign Goblin. He hates it, but in the end he finds love. He’s still a sarcastic, foul-mouthed, little creature, but he’s one of the best characters in the entire series.

Virginia au Augustus (Mustang) is also very brilliant, beautiful of course, but I also enjoy how much of a BOSS she is. She had me a little scared at the end of Golden Son, but she worked her way back into my good graces as Morning Star progressed.

Victra au Julii’s overt sexuality was at first irritating (I wasn’t sure if I was going to be able to like her character), but ended up being charming. She flirts unabashedly with just about everything that moves. But, she is also awesome, and things take an unexpected turn for her in the love department. It was great.

Then there’s Ragnar. Sweet, giant, warrior Ragnar. Scary to look at. Scary to watch in battle. Loves kids. And I love him.

The Telemanuses are loveable as well. Also giant. Also scary to watch in battle. Kevax has a fox that he loves as much as his own children. It really doesn’t get any better than that.

Cassius au Bellona. Oh, Cassius.

Roque au Fabii. I can’t even. I loved him even through everything.

Those are just the characters I like. The villains, are all terrifying. Octavia, the Sovereign, is cunning. She has ruled the Society for 60 years, beheading her own father to take his throne. She has captured Darrow multiple times, and even though he’s escaped her, she’s not keen to let him go again.

Aja, The Protean Knight and one of three Furies that protect the Sovereign. She’s fierce, a fighter with no rival, the best student of her teacher, Lorn au Arcos (the best Olympic Knight there ever was). She is truly fearsome. I wouldn’t want to be her prey.

Adrius (The Jackal), Mustang’s twin, absolutely scares me. A sociopath with fighting skill, he manipulates his way around the politics of the Society, building a following of Golds and lowColors to use as he pleases. He is always a step ahead of Darrow. Speaking of, I want to share a thought that my friend Mary brought to my attention; a thought that I believe is brilliant. She had suggested one change for this series, one change I never would have thought of, but would have been great. She thinks the Jackal should have been a woman. Sit with that for a moment, and think. It’s common for the most vile of villains to be a man, but imagine if Adrius was a woman; how completely terrifying would she have been? Imagine, the face of the woman Darrow loves on his most formidable enemy; all of the horrors from Darrow forcing her to cut off her own hand, to the destruction at the end of Morning Star. Adrius’ withdrawal from Mustang after their mother left, ordering the death of her older brother. Imagine. She would have been more dreadful than any other person in this series. Mary’s right, it would have made the book that much better.

These books overall were just phenomenal. I’m sad that it’s over, but I hear there’s going to be a spinoff novel, and that makes me happy again. Literally everyone needs to read these.
13 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Daryl
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Spoiler free
Reviewed in the United States on February 14, 2021
I’ve more recently discovered the red rising trilogy. I just finished morning star and of the three this was my favorite. The first is just great. The second is good but not quite the level of the first. The third is the payoff of everything from one and two. I always keep... See more
I’ve more recently discovered the red rising trilogy. I just finished morning star and of the three this was my favorite. The first is just great. The second is good but not quite the level of the first. The third is the payoff of everything from one and two. I always keep my book reviews somewhat brief and vague as I don’t like to give away plot details but there are some twists in this book that catch you off guard and you want to read more.

While not a complaint from me, I do know people who followed this series from release. We all know now there is a fourth and fifth book out. Initially it was being marketed as a trilogy and ending there. They were somewhat disappointed in the ending as it kept it open and allowed the following books to be made. I’m just acknowledging their feelings and see the validity of if. The ending doesn’t feel like an “ending”. But I think if you’re reading this review and deciding on reading this. You’re aware it didn’t end and it will not bother you.
One person found this helpful
Helpful
Report
W. F. Ocharuk
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I wanted to love this, and I thought there was potential after ...
Reviewed in the United States on September 7, 2017
Just finished the entire trilogy. I made myself finish since I had invested so much time in the story. I wanted to love this, and I thought there was potential after reading Red Rising, however I am emencely disappointed. There was potential for a great human... See more
Just finished the entire trilogy. I made myself finish since I had invested so much time in the story. I wanted to love this, and I thought there was potential after reading Red Rising, however I am emencely disappointed.

There was potential for a great human story, as well as an action novel, but I feel Pierce Brown did not rise to the occasion. He copied Susan Collins and the Hunger Games, but he failed to match her ability to carry a believable storyline through 3 novels.

He opted for cheap theatrics, leading the story one way only to fool the reader that what they just read didn''t really happen the way it read. That might be okay once or twice, but not through out 3 novels. He portrays his characters one way only to lay waste to their evolution. I am not completely opposed to that style of writing, but after awhile, I lost the ability to believe anything about anyone of the characters and, I stopped caring.

I usually finish a series and find myself missing the characters, like I just lost a friend. Not this time. Maybe if he spent more time writing the human story and less time creating a script for an action movie this could have been a better trilogy. It is clear to me the latter was the objective.
9 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
CR
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Can a Book REALLY Be This Good?! Oh Yes, It Can!
Reviewed in the United States on October 23, 2017
It is a rare occurrence indeed that a series gets better and better and better....! I''m an 8th grade English teacher that reads every book that I put on my shelves, and Mr. Brown''s books happened to be next on my list. Unfortunately, these books aren''t quite... See more
It is a rare occurrence indeed that a series gets better and better and better....!
I''m an 8th grade English teacher that reads every book that I put on my shelves, and Mr. Brown''s books happened to be next on my list. Unfortunately, these books aren''t quite appropriate due to the more mature adult content, but...
WOW. Am I thrilled I came across this series!
Mr. Brown, I''ve read hundreds of books, in every genre there is, and this makes the top five in my reading career! The twisting plot, the beautiful development of the characters ... I''ve been ruined. I''ve tried three books since I''ve finished Morning Star and I''ve deleted each one from my kindle because they just can''t compare. I suppose I''ll sit and slowly digest this gem of a novel...
I''ve already ordered 10 copies of the first book to pass out to my friends - don''t miss out on this series, my fellow readers!
5 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Reasonable Reviewer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An excellent conclusion to the Trilogy
Reviewed in the United States on February 16, 2016
The wait for the third novel was worth it! The novel picks up 9-12 months after the events of "Golden Son." While the previous two novels centered on Darrow''s leadership and individual challenges, this novel picks up on the notion of the... See more
The wait for the third novel was worth it!

The novel picks up 9-12 months after the events of "Golden Son."

While the previous two novels centered on Darrow''s leadership and individual challenges, this novel picks up on the notion of the disadvantaged members of the Society banding together.

Well done!

** Beware Good Readers for Spoilers Follow **

Darrow was taken prisoner at the end of "Golden Son."

He was tortured and broken by the Jackal.

There is no doubt of that. Darrow''s secrets are known. He has told the bad guys everything that he knows, and Darrow has begged for death.

The whole tone of this novel is different than the previous two.

If you are looking for Darrow to "clever his way out" of the situation then you will be disappointed.

What happens instead though is rather remarkable and paves the way for a satisfying ending to the trilogy.

Instead, Darrow is rescued by a pair of Grays from Earth! The rebellion has captured the imagination of billions.

While the rebellion continues, it needs Darrow as the soul of the movement.

Darrow takes on the role of the spirit and visible leader of the rebellion, but now there are other players (more capable players) actually running the show.

We also find out that Mustang is carrying Darrow''s child!

The final scene in the "Golden Son" where Mustang leaves is not because she is betraying Darrow. It is because she spoke to Darrow''s mum who convinces Mustang not to tell Darrow for fear it will make her son leave his role as the leader of the rebellion.

Well done!

I won''t give away all the twists and turns, but I found this to be a much quicker read than the previous two books.

If the truth be told, I read it cover to cover on a plane ride overseas.

I highly recommend this book!
11 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Sidney Young
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A satisfying conclusion to the saga
Reviewed in the United States on July 5, 2016
Morning Star is the third book in Pierce Brown’s Red Rising Trilogy. While I did not enjoy it as much as the previous two books, it nevertheless provides a satisfying if uneven conclusion to the saga. Like its two predecessors, Morning Star is action-packed from... See more
Morning Star is the third book in Pierce Brown’s Red Rising Trilogy. While I did not enjoy it as much as the previous two books, it nevertheless provides a satisfying if uneven conclusion to the saga.

Like its two predecessors, Morning Star is action-packed from beginning to end. But despite its fast pacing, the first half of the book did not really grab my attention. While I was reading the first two books, I was constantly on the edge of my seat, wondering what Darrow was going to do next and if he was going to be exposed as an impostor. With his secrets now in the open, and with more than half of the book still to go, I was in no doubt that he would succeed in whatever missions he embarked upon, which significantly lessened the suspense quotient. Furthermore, there is a tonal shift in the first part of the book that is quite jarring. In order to bolster his army, Darrow seeks an alliance with the Obsidians, a tribe of fierce warriors who for decades have been duped into worshiping the Golds as gods. The Obsidians are a primitive people who still fight with spears and ride giant griffins. This part of the book reads more like a medieval fantasy than the science fiction I signed up for. While other readers may not be bothered by this, it is just not my cup of tea.

Once we are past the midway point, the book picks up considerably. The tactics Darrow uses to best his foes in battle are often brilliant; and there are plenty of twists to keep readers guessing. But what gives the book its emotional impact is the nuanced relationship between Darrow and his enemies. Many of these are people whom Darrow used to call friends; and care is taken not to demonize them, but to portray them as people who believe in their cause as strongly as Darrow believes in his. Of course, there are a few foaming-at-the-mouth villains that readers would be more than happy to root against, but Darrow''s refusal to let some of his friendships go is what makes part of this book truly heartbreaking. Luckily, things are not all dark. Darrow''s friends Sevro, Virginia, and Victra are all given their moment in the sun and their support is what gives Darrow the strength to do what he needs to do.

In the end, Morning Star is an enjoyable if flawed book. The ever shifting loyalty between Darrow''s friends, enemies, and allies are confusing at times; and towards the end, there are too many twists and the ending is too neatly tied up. One twist in particular is such a deus ex machina that it cheapened the impact of what came before. Still, one can do worse when it comes to books of this genre and on the strength of the series as a whole, I would heartily recommend it.
2 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Livre Grumpus
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Meh. Weakest of the series.
Reviewed in the United States on February 15, 2020
I zipped through the first two books despite their plodding paces only to get stuck on this one. I fully expect a first book in a series to be a slow burn because world building and character introductions need to happen. I even expect a little slog during a second book... See more
I zipped through the first two books despite their plodding paces only to get stuck on this one. I fully expect a first book in a series to be a slow burn because world building and character introductions need to happen. I even expect a little slog during a second book because that''s generally the heart of the journey where the characters are "developed". This book though, it''s almost as if the author didn''t even read his own books. The characters don''t develope, and the story doesn''t really exist. The end is a dirty trick that I found hard to swallow. If you''re here then you''ll already know that this site has a tendency to fill the first 80% with a lot of nothing interspersed with random action with the last 20% having a ton of action and endless lists of names thrown at you with a big dramatic end that''s relatively unexpected. He attempts it again here and it just doesn''t work. I don''t think I can go on to the next books in the series.
Helpful
Report

Top reviews from other countries

Dan
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Enough twists and turns to rival even A Song of Ice and Fire
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 8, 2017
With any trilogy there is always the worry that the end will not live up to whatever expectations we have built over the first two books. But in this case you need not worry. Morning Star continues the ravaging pace set by its predecessor and if you found Golden Son...See more
With any trilogy there is always the worry that the end will not live up to whatever expectations we have built over the first two books. But in this case you need not worry. Morning Star continues the ravaging pace set by its predecessor and if you found Golden Son difficult to put down, you will most certainly have similar problems here. The third instalment of this series begins with Darrow at his lowest. The war is no longer a civil war between golds, but a clash of colours across all of the solar system. For me, the most extraordinary thing about this book is that I really could not predict a single thing - an extremely hard thing to achieve in this day and age. There is no black and white here. Every single character is unpredictable, every single one at risk of adding themselves to Pierce Brown''s increasing list of victims. The twists and turns and shock throughout rivals that of even A Song of Ice and Fire. Utterly enthralling. A brilliant end to a brilliant series.
6 people found this helpful
Report
Cindy (Midnight Blue)
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
but surprisingly I felt better giving it time
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 17, 2016
The long awaited conclusion to the Red Rising trilogy finally arrived in the beginning of February. People all over the world were eagerly waiting to read what had happened to Darrow and the uprising after the events in Golden Son. I was one of those people. I pre-ordered...See more
The long awaited conclusion to the Red Rising trilogy finally arrived in the beginning of February. People all over the world were eagerly waiting to read what had happened to Darrow and the uprising after the events in Golden Son. I was one of those people. I pre-ordered the book as soon as I could and practically screamed when it turned up on my doorstep the day of its release in the UK. I had expected to devour it in a day, but surprisingly I felt better giving it time. Brown has created an amazing trilogy, with Morning Star as a solid end. Well, it’s not really an end is it? Soon after its release, Brown revealed that he is writing another trilogy that focuses on life in Darrow’s world after what happened in Morning Star. But back to this book. Expectations for the final book in a series are always high and it can be very tricky to get it just right. Morning Star picks up more than a year after the end of Golden Son. The end of Golden Son left many gasping for breath and even more impatient for the follow-up. Things weren’t looking good for Darrow and the Sons of Ares. Brown uses these kind of setbacks perfectly to make the characters grow and develop their relationships a bit more. It’s hard to come back from what most of them went through, but it’s defining how they all deal with it. All of them have come a long way since Red Rising. They are not children anymore and they are now so wrapped up in this war, that the only way forward is straight through. As Darrow puts it: “I am not alone. I am not his victim. So let him do his worst. I am the Reaper. I know how to suffer. I know the darkness.” Almost all our favourite characters share Darrow’s spotlight and those that were lost in the previous books have certainly not been forgotten. Readers favourite, Sevro, livens up the whole book again with his foul language, his crazy plans and his unwavering loyalty. But readers of the series know that what happened in Golden Son will have a severe impact on our favourite Howler. I was glad to see Sevro rise to his full potential in this book (with some guidance from Darrow and his friends). Victra’s fate was unclear and I’m really happy with the road Brown took with her character. She is such an interesting addition to the story and I enjoyed reading about her from the very first moment she appeared. Mustang obviously also plays a vital role in this war. She is easily one of the smartest people in this war and her bond with Darrow is one that was tentatively and delicately explored throughout the book. Roque and Cassius’s storylines also get a satisfying end, something I was a bit afraid of in the beginning, but unjustly so it seems. Brown’s signature plot twists are back again and I have to admit that it’s only because I know his writing and I know how the plot twists in his previous books that I didn’t stop reading at one point towards the end. It wasn’t because something was wrong with the writing or the story, but he almost did something to break my heart. It was only my solid belief in the fact that this couldn’t be all, that there was more to it, that kept me reading. But damn, Pierce, you know how to toy with our emotions. Throughout the book, Brown again succeeded in impressing me with his writing. He wrote some beautiful and powerful quotes like this one: “And I wonder, in my last moments, if the planet does not mind that we wound her surface or pillage her bounty, because she knows we silly warm things are not even a breath in her cosmic life. We have grown and spread, and will rage and die. And when all that remains of us is our steel monuments and plastic idols, her winds will whisper, her sands will shift, and she will spin on and on, forgetting about the bold, hairless apes who thought they deserved immortality.” Morning Star is again a powerful mix between an almost lyrical style and the fluid prose that keeps you flipping the pages. As soon as you start reading, time seems to pass by without you noticing. I was beyond excited when I started this book and it definitely didn’t let me down. It delivered a satisfying ending to the trilogy and all the storylines. I’m curious to see what the next trilogy will bring, though at this point I’m quite happy with how things ended. If you’re still wondering if you should start reading the Red Rising Trilogy, here’s me giving you a firm “DO IT!”. The Red Rising Trilogy is one of the best I’ve read in a while and I can’t recommend it enough.
Report
C. M. Leung
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Fantastic book to round off the trilogy
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 9, 2016
Initial reaction: AHHHHHHHHHHH!! I''ve been waiting for this ever since I finished the second book and it did NOT DISAPPOINT. Third books in a trilogy often suffer from too much plot compressed into too little time, too many threads unsolved and unnecessary gobbets of happy...See more
Initial reaction: AHHHHHHHHHHH!! I''ve been waiting for this ever since I finished the second book and it did NOT DISAPPOINT. Third books in a trilogy often suffer from too much plot compressed into too little time, too many threads unsolved and unnecessary gobbets of happy ending stuck in right at the last minute. Thankfully this did none of that. Yes, the plot is fast-paced, but let''s be real it''s been fast paced the entire trilogy, and it still makes time to cover everything thoroughly. Thinking back, there are so many moments of foreshadowing or partial realisation that all pull together later on to make things fit into place. There''s so many twists and I was utterly terrified for all my favourite characters all the way through because people were dying left, right and centre. The thing is that I love all the characters, even if I don''t like them. Everyone is well-rounded out with motives and motivations, backstory, little character flaws and cracks in the facade. The plots go every which way and there were several twists that had me internally screaming (internally only, because I mostly read whilst on public transport, and it''s unseemly to yell CASSIUS YOU BASTARD in public). I need to go re-read the entire trilogy again.
2 people found this helpful
Report
Georgiana89
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Satisfying, epic conclusion, but dragged in parts
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 27, 2017
As with the rest of the series, I had mixed feelings about this final instalment. It was very long and covered a huge range of events. As a result, I had to admire its epic scale and the author''s ambition. It certainly did a good job of wrapping everything up in a way that...See more
As with the rest of the series, I had mixed feelings about this final instalment. It was very long and covered a huge range of events. As a result, I had to admire its epic scale and the author''s ambition. It certainly did a good job of wrapping everything up in a way that was satisfying without being trite, and it had some great individual scenes. Overall though, it just felt like there was a bit too much going on, and it struggled to hold my attention for entire chapters at a time. About halfway through, I put it down for a few weeks and almost didn''t pick it back up. While I''m glad I persevered, that''s not what I''d expect and hope for from a book like this.
2 people found this helpful
Report
daryl mander
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
3.5 stars
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 14, 2021
Like all the books in this series so far I’m torn between a 3 or a 4 star rating. What I liked about this book over the previous 2 instalments: greater depth in many of the characters; more touching, “very human” little moments; excellent pacing and bouncing between chaotic...See more
Like all the books in this series so far I’m torn between a 3 or a 4 star rating. What I liked about this book over the previous 2 instalments: greater depth in many of the characters; more touching, “very human” little moments; excellent pacing and bouncing between chaotic and emotional parts. What I didn’t like: like the rest of the series I feel like this is “comic book sci fi” or what I sometimes call “fantasy in space.” For me, personally, in my sci fi I need at least a little “hardness” to it; meaning enough exposition and plausibility for me to think I’m reading a future that is at least remotely possible. I didn’t find this future even remotely possible, and struggling sometimes to suspend my disbelief did hamper my enjoyment of the plot (which was to be fair very good).
Report
See all reviews
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who bought this item also bought

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who viewed this item also viewed

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Pages with related products.

  • mars fiction
  • dystopian novel
  • Orange Books
  • Science Fiction Sets

Morning outlet sale Star (Red discount Rising Series) online

Morning outlet sale Star (Red discount Rising Series) online

Morning outlet sale Star (Red discount Rising Series) online

Morning outlet sale Star (Red discount Rising Series) online

Morning outlet sale Star (Red discount Rising Series) online

Morning outlet sale Star (Red discount Rising Series) online

Morning outlet sale Star (Red discount Rising Series) online

Morning outlet sale Star (Red discount Rising Series) online

Morning outlet sale Star (Red discount Rising Series) online

Morning outlet sale Star (Red discount Rising Series) online

Morning outlet sale Star (Red discount Rising Series) online

Morning outlet sale Star (Red discount Rising Series) online

Morning outlet sale Star (Red discount Rising Series) online

Morning outlet sale Star (Red discount Rising Series) online

Morning outlet sale Star (Red discount Rising Series) online

Morning outlet sale Star (Red discount Rising Series) online

Morning outlet sale Star (Red discount Rising Series) online

Morning outlet sale Star (Red discount Rising Series) online

Morning outlet sale Star (Red discount Rising Series) online

Morning outlet sale Star (Red discount Rising Series) online

Morning outlet sale Star (Red discount Rising Series) online

Morning outlet sale Star (Red discount Rising Series) online

Morning outlet sale Star (Red discount Rising Series) online

Morning outlet sale Star (Red discount Rising Series) online

Morning outlet sale Star (Red discount Rising Series) online