Jack sale outlet sale Nicklaus sale

Jack sale outlet sale Nicklaus sale

Jack sale outlet sale Nicklaus sale

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Product Description

In a long-awaited autobiography, the "Golden Bear" chronicles his life in golf, discussing his youth, rise to the top of the golfing world, record-breaking career, relationships with other top golfers, family, and the issues of the game. 125,000 first printing.

Amazon.com Review

As "The Golfer of the Century," Jack Nicklaus is a recognized authority on the game''s history and direction, and in his 13th book, My Story, he shares the details of his most impressive victories. With 20 major championships under his belt, he has plenty of highlights to share, including shot-by-shot analyses of his classic battles with fellow legends Arnold Palmer, Gary Player, and Tom Watson. Indeed, Nicklaus seems to recall every shot of his illustrious career, and he is able to infuse his discussions of final round action with suspense, even though we''ve known the outcomes all these years. To this erudite study of golf the Golden Bear adds personal elements that reveal the man behind the one-iron. Nicklaus describes his business dealings--both successes and failures--his love of golf course design, the effects of celebrity status, and his childhood. Written with his longtime collaborator Ken Bowden, My Story is another eagle for the man whose name fills the record books.

From Library Journal

Nicklaus, winner of the Professional Golfer''s Association''s Golfer of the Century award in 1988, covers some of the same ground with longtime associate Bowden that he did with renowned golf historian Herbert Warren Wind in The Greatest Game of All (1969). Here, Nicklaus focuses on his Hall of Fame career, beginning with his victory in the 1959 U.S. Amateur Championship and concluding with his dramatic win in The Masters in 1986 at the age of 46. Shot-by-shot, hole-by-hole descriptions of many of his record championships are included along with his notions on the present condition of professional golf. With a graciousness and humility rarely found in sports biographies today, the Golden Bear relates his feelings about rivals (Arnold Palmer and more), heroes (Bobby Jones, Ben Hogan), and family. But it''s when he describes what he considers the key mental requirements for winning consistently and his own approach to getting ready for a tournament that Nicklaus reveals the temperament of a tenacious competitor driven by the absolute need to win. Recommended for all sports collections.?Peter Ward, Lindenhurst Memorial Lib., West Islip, N.Y.
Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Booklist

Jack Nicklaus has written numerous golf instructionals, but this volume represents his first swing at pure autobiography. It''s a clean hit, like a Nicklaus tee shot. Structuring his story around the 20 major championships he won from 1959 through 1986, Nicklaus and coauthor Bowden deliver an indispensable survey of modern golf history. Remarkably, the shot-by-shot accounts of the crucial holes of those 20 tournaments never turn dull, as happens so often when sports stars recount their heroics. Rather, we see the action anew, through the ever-analytical and remarkably humble eyes of the best golfer ever to swing a club. Nicklaus'' comments never fail to add depth and context to the reader''s own recollection of these signature moments in golf''s past, most often by allowing us inside his head, where we find, surprisingly, a large measure of self-doubt. What comes across most forcibly in this fine book is Nicklaus'' respect for the complexity of golf and the never-ending challenges it affords players at every level. The chapter in which Nicklaus discusses being forced to entirely remake his swing in 1979 in order to stay competitive is perhaps the greatest testament possible to the rigors of golf. Discussion of his family life and business career round out the volume, but Nicklaus rarely drifts too far from the fairway. Golf fans won''t mind that a bit; most of them are more interested in golf than real life anyway. Bill Ott

Review

Particulars are the book''s specialty.... For this alone, the book has value on a bookshelf, for Nicklaus''s career deserves a formal record. -- The New York Times Book Review, Michael Bamburger

About the Author

Jack Nicklaus was born in 1940 in Columbus, Ohio, and maintains a home there and in Florida. Widely regarded as the greatest golfer of all time, he has achieved a record twenty major championship victories, consisting of two U.S. Amateurs, six Masters (also a record), four U.S. Opens, three British Opens, and five PGA Championships. The winner of more than 100 professional tournaments around the world, Nicklaus was named Golfer of the Century in 1988.

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4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
21 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Waller C. Tabb Jr.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good book by a Great Golfer. A short book report of things I want to remember.
Reviewed in the United States on March 1, 2016
Good topic (Jack''s major tournament wins) by a great golfer and sportsman (Jack Nicklaus). Here''s my book report: Jack Nicklaus’ instruction from Jack Grout My Story p. 384-6 1. The first and always the most important of Jack’s fundamentals concerned your... See more
Good topic (Jack''s major tournament wins) by a great golfer and sportsman (Jack Nicklaus). Here''s my book report:
Jack Nicklaus’ instruction from Jack Grout
My Story p. 384-6
1. The first and always the most important of Jack’s fundamentals concerned your head. You had to keep it in the same place throughout the swing, not rigidly anchored by steady. It wasn’t good enough to “keep your eye on the ball,” because you could keep your eye on the ball and still move your head around quite a lot, and when you did that you changed your body angles, which messed up your arc, and upset your balance, and wrecked your timing.
2. The second of Jack’s basics concerned the other end of the anatomy, the feet. Here, he believed, lay the source of balance and of full free coiling and uncoiling of the body, both indispensable to good golf. The way you achieved them was through your ankles. you didn’t go at it stiffed-legged like a stork, or jump up on your toes like a ballerina. What you did was roll your left ankle inward on the backswing and your right ankle inward on the through-swing. “But that’s hard to do, Mr. Grout!” “Well, then, Jackie boy, let’s see you hit those three buckets of balls without letting your heels come of the ground even a little bit.”
3. Number three in Jack’s order of priorities was to hit the ball as hard and far as you possibly could from the moment your first pick up a golf club. Even a hint of laziness in this regard would bring stern disapproval. ...Jack believed in it for three reasons.
a. first, raw distance is the number-one weapon in a golfer’s armory.
b. second, height with the longer clubs—a product of great clubhead speed—came a close second.
c. third, if you didn’t fully extend and stretch and strengthen your golfing muscles when you were young, you would never do so when you got older. The encouragement to belt the ball was endless and exciting, “Go on, Jackie boy, hit it harder. Give it hell. Whack the daylights out that ball. Don’t worry about where it goes. We can fix that later. Go ahead, knock the devil out of this one.”
4. He had one more fundamental. This was the size of the clubhead’s arc in the backswing. For him, it could never be too big. “And there’s only one way to make it as big as I want to see it, Jackie boy. You’ve got to turn that body of yours around until it just won’t go any farther, and you got to extend those arms until they reach right on up through the clouds.”

His father to him when he was a boy just starting: “Hit it hard, go find it, and hit it hard again.” p. 10.

Gives a lot of credit for his success to a stable family life provided by Barbara Bash Nicklaus, his wife. p. 407-8.

Sam Snead joked about Ben Hogan’s reticence in putting that he had one and two cigarette putts.

Four qualities shared by consistent winners (151-2)
1. ability to think clearly under pressure. This is the most important, and this is the reason Nicklaus thinks helped him win the most.
2. patience
3. self-centeredness. Hogan was playing with Claude Harmon on the 12th hole at the Masters. After the hole Hogan commented that was the first time he birdied the hole, apparently not noticing that Claude had aced it.
4. hard work. Working hard at the previous three when your game is not going well.

Jack really wanted to be liked by the crowds more than his stoic appearance revealed. He knew Arnie was more popular and maybe he wanted some of that fan devotion too. After being winless in 1979, people were wondering if the Old Jack had gone. He decided he needed to change his swing. Things were coming together 3 weeks before the national tournament and he got a putting tip from Jack Grout, “hit the ball!” But in 1980 as he made the turn on the final round of the US Open at Baltusrol crowds had to be held back by marshals. He needed a police escort to take him from the greens to the tees. People encircled the greens seemingly fifty deep. Up the 18th hole the fans were screaming “Jack! Jack! Jack!” After his opponent made his final putt to finish 2 back the crowd rushed him, one accidentally kicking him in the shin. He needed marshals to escort him to scorer’s tent. It was “the most emotional and warmest reaction to any of my wins in my own country, and it remains as sharp and wonderful to any of my wins in my memory all these years later as the day it happened.” Chapter “Jack’s Back!” p. 399.

JC Snead on playing Nicklaus: “When you go head to head against Nicklaus, he knows he’s going to beat you, you know he’s going to beat you, and he knows you know he’s going to beat you.” The Intimidation Factor. p. 427.

1986 win at Augusta. Herbert Warren Wind The New Yorker reporter and in Nicklaus’ mind golf’s top historian called it “nothing less than the most important accomplishment in golf since Bobby Jones’ Grand Slam in 1930.” Arnie wrote a telegram: “That was fantastic! Congratulations. Do you think there’s any chance for a fifty-six-year-old?

Jack Grout’s letter to Nicklaus after he won the golfer of the century award p 400-401. An excerpt:
What you have going for you, however, was born into you and then nurtured by your home life. When Charlie told you you couldn’t play anymore if you threw another club, he did you a great favor, Jack.
Don’t get me wrong. You wouldn’t be the “Player of the Century” if you weren’t a heckuva player. But so is Arnold a heckuva player, and Byron, and the rest of them. And they are all great sports. After the judges gave it a lot of thought, though, they gave the honor to the guy who is a great sport and a great sportsman. As far as I’m concerned you are the greatest golfer who ever swung a club in the entire history of the game.

Nicklaus, Jack with Ken Bowden. My Story. 1997. Simon & Schuster.
ISBN 0-684-83628-9
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Craig Matteson
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
You think you know Jack Nicklaus? I did, too. But I didn''t.
Reviewed in the United States on December 22, 2015
What a wonderful read. Mr. Nicklaus''s victories were far from the inevitable deeds of a conquering god as they seemed to me as a child. Only a few came relatively easily. Mostly there was searching, thinking, courage, guts, and struggle to win the competition. And he... See more
What a wonderful read. Mr. Nicklaus''s victories were far from the inevitable deeds of a conquering god as they seemed to me as a child. Only a few came relatively easily. Mostly there was searching, thinking, courage, guts, and struggle to win the competition. And he loved it all. He has great and wonderful things to say about all the golfers he competed against and glorious information about his family.

I loved this book. I will treasure it forever.
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E. T. Hennig
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I absolutely loved this book
Reviewed in the United States on December 18, 2017
I absolutely loved this book!! I''ve read it cover to cover at least twice. I highly recommend to anyone who loves the game and wants to learn from one it''s all-time greats. A great golfer, and a great human being.
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J. M. W. Sinclair
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great insight into world of golf
Reviewed in the United States on January 21, 2014
This was a wonderful book when it was first published, and it has stood the test of time. The inside story told by one of the greatest players of the game is interesting, funny, and thought-provoking as well. Nicklaus is well aware of his legion of fans, but he is very... See more
This was a wonderful book when it was first published, and it has stood the test of time. The inside story told by one of the greatest players of the game is interesting, funny, and thought-provoking as well. Nicklaus is well aware of his legion of fans, but he is very honest about his ups and downs during his career. He faults only himself for not doing more, but at the same time inspires us and the next generation of golfers to continue to improve the game.
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Nona
5.0 out of 5 stars
An Incredibly Charming and Informative Book
Reviewed in the United States on February 24, 2001
Jack Nicklaus'' career is one of the greatest in all sports. Especially famous are his 18 major victories (20 if you count the US Amateur), and this book is a story about those victories, and his life in between. His book is divided into 20 chapters - one for each of those... See more
Jack Nicklaus'' career is one of the greatest in all sports. Especially famous are his 18 major victories (20 if you count the US Amateur), and this book is a story about those victories, and his life in between. His book is divided into 20 chapters - one for each of those major victories, and in them he discusses the events which transpired before that particular tournament, and the tournament itself. What a natural yet perfect structure for a book like this!
The best aspect of the book, I felt, was the immediacy with which Nicklaus writes. When you read this book you almost feel as if Nicklaus is talking to you, just yourself, at points.
Each chapter talks about a particular tournament and what happened before it. Particularly amazing is the clarity with which Nicklaus can recall those tournaments he describes. He describes individual key holes, what was going through his mind, and the general up and downs which accompany a round of golf. After reading this book, we know Nicklaus is a champion: he can win not only when he''s up, but also when he''s (to some extent) down. Also, as an interesting side note, Nicklaus also gives a few golfing tips - perhaps no one can become as great as him, but it never hurts to try!
And the last aspect of the book I found enjoyable were the photographs. True, they were black and white, but show how he changed over time, and chronicle some of the most memorable moments of his major career wins.
You come away more convinced than ever of Nicklaus'' greatness. A great book to read anywhere, anytime.
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Blaine Greenfield
4.0 out of 5 stars
if you are a real golf fan, you''ll like this
Reviewed in the United States on August 8, 1997
the one-line summary says it all . . . for me, it provided a bit too much detail on various golf tournaments . . . would have wanted to see more on business side . . . also, it virtually elminated the last 10 years of his life . . . but a great gift item for a true golfing... See more
the one-line summary says it all . . . for me, it provided a bit too much detail on various golf tournaments . . . would have wanted to see more on business side . . . also, it virtually elminated the last 10 years of his life . . . but a great gift item for a true golfing enthusiast
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Top reviews from other countries

Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
great read
Reviewed in Canada on December 4, 2020
For every golfer, this is well written and a great read
For every golfer, this is well written and a great read
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Bob Enns
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Really a good book
Reviewed in Canada on November 22, 2018
Good account of Jacks golfing career
Good account of Jacks golfing career
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ゴルバン
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
良かった
Reviewed in Japan on May 23, 2013
巨人ニクラウスが身近に感じられる良書でした。装幀も大変気にいりました。
巨人ニクラウスが身近に感じられる良書でした。装幀も大変気にいりました。
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