Holding lowest Up the high quality Universe online

Holding lowest Up the high quality Universe online

Holding lowest Up the high quality Universe online
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New York Times Bestseller

From the author of the New York Times bestseller All the Bright Places comes a heart-wrenching story about what it means to see someone—and love someone—for who they truly are.

Everyone thinks they know Libby Strout, the girl once dubbed “America’s Fattest Teen.” But no one’s taken the time to look past her weight to get to know who she really is. Following her mom’s death, she’s been picking up the pieces in the privacy of her home, dealing with her heartbroken father and her own grief. Now, Libby’s ready: for high school, for new friends, for love, and for EVERY POSSIBILITY LIFE HAS TO OFFER. In that moment, I know the part I want to play here at MVB High. I want to be the girl who can do anything. 

Everyone thinks they know Jack Masselin, too. Yes, he’s got swagger, but he’s also mastered the impossible art of giving people what they want, of fitting in. What no one knows is that Jack has a newly acquired secret: he can’t recognize faces. Even his own brothers are strangers to him. He’s the guy who can re-engineer and rebuild anything in new and bad-ass ways, but he can’t understand what’s going on with the inner workings of his brain. So he tells himself to play it cool: Be charming. Be hilarious. Don’t get too close to anyone. 

Until he meets Libby. When the two get tangled up in a cruel high school game—which lands them in group counseling and community service—Libby and Jack are both pissed, and then surprised. Because the more time they spend together, the less alone they feel. . . . Because sometimes when you meet someone, it changes the world, theirs and yours.

Jennifer Niven delivers another poignant, exhilarating love story about finding that person who sees you for who you are—and seeing them right back.

" Niven is adept at creating characters. . . . [Libby''s] courage and body-positivity make for  a joyful reading experience."  --The New York Times

Holding Up the Universe . . . taps into the universal need to be understood. To be wanted. And that’s what makes it such a remarkable read.”  —TeenVogue.com, “Why New Book Holding Up the Universe Is the Next The Fault in Our Stars”

"Want a love story that will give you all the feels? . . . You''ll seriously melt!" —Seventeen Magazine

Review

★ "[Niven] creates two indelible characters and a heart-stopping romance." — Publishers Weekly starred review

★ "Written in short chapters of alternating perspectives, this is a thoughtful exploration of identity and self-acceptance, with commentary on overcoming adversities that will hit close to home." — School Library Journal starred review

★ "This is a worthy addition to any young adult collection; the story is engaging and difficult to put down." — VOYA starred review

"Niven’s honest writing shares a story of friendship, confidence, strength, and identity—and it’s not one to be missed."  —Buzzfeed

"Libby and Jack are two characters who will reach out of the page and climb into your heart! . . . [A] beautiful love story." —Justine Magazine

"A novel about love and how important it is to be seen." — Popsugar

"Moving. . . . The true heart of the tale lies in personal growth and learning to love yourself."  —Bookish

“I''ve never fallen in love with characters as fast as I fell for Libby and Jack. . . .  Holding Up the Universe is a beautiful reminder of the power of understanding.” —Jay Asher, #1  New York Times bestselling author of  Thirteen Reasons Why
 
Gorgeously written and oh-so-deeply felt,  Holding Up the Universe contains one of my favorite characters of all time! You will absolutely fall in love with Libby Strout!” —Nicola Yoon, #1  New York Times bestselling author of  Everything, Everything
 
“At once hilarious and achingly poignant, Jennifer Niven’s  Holding up the Universe  brims with love and heart and hope. A gorgeous, life-affirming book that—like its lovable and resilient main character, Libby—will make you want to open your arms wide, lift your face to the sky, and twirl.” —Kerry Kletter, author of  The First Time She Drowned

Praise for All the Bright Places:

“[A]  heartbreaking love story about two funny, fragile, and wildly damaged high school kids.” — Entertainment Weekly
 
“A  do-not-miss for fans of Eleanor & Park and The Fault in Our Stars , and basically anyone who can breathe.”  —Justine Magazine
 
“At the heart—a big one—of  All the Bright Places lies a  charming love story about this unlikely and endearing pair of broken teenagers.”  —The New York Times Book Review

About the Author

Jennifer Niven is the author of the New York Times and international bestseller All the Bright Places. She has also written four novels for adults— American Blonde, Becoming Clementine, Velva Jean Learns to Fly, and Velva Jean Learns to Drive—as well as three nonfiction books— The Ice Master, Ada Blackjack, and The Aqua Net Diaries, a memoir about her high school experiences. She grew up in Indiana and now lives with her fiancé and literary cats in Los Angeles. For more information, visit JenniferNiven.com, GermMagazine.com, or find her on Facebook or Twitter.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Libby

 

 

If a genie popped out of my bedside lamp, I would wish for these three things: my mom to be alive, nothing bad or sad to ever happen again, and to be a member of the Martin Van Buren High School Damsels, the best drill team in the tristate area.

 

But what if the Damsels don’t want you?

 

It is 3:38 a.m., and the time of night when my mind starts running around all wild and out of control, like my cat, George, when he was a kitten. All of a sudden, there goes my brain, climbing the curtains. There it is, swinging from the bookshelf. There it is, with its paw in the fish tank and its head underwater.

 

I lie on my bed, staring up into the dark, and my mind bounces across the room.

 

What if you get trapped again? What if they have to knock down the cafeteria door or the bathroom wall to get you out? What if your dad gets married and then he dies and you’re left with the new wife and stepsiblings? What if you die? What if there is no heaven and you never see your mom again?

 

I tell myself to sleep.

 

I close my eyes and lie very still.

 

Very still.

 

For minutes.

 

I make my mind lie there with me and tell it, Sleep, sleep, sleep.

 

What if you get to school and realize that things are different and kids are different, and no matter how much you try, you will never be able to catch up to them?

 

I open my eyes.

 

My name is Libby Strout. You’ve probably heard of me. You’ve probably watched the video of me being rescued from my own house. At last count, 6,345,981 people have watched it, so there’s a good chance you’re one of them. Three years ago, I was America’s Fattest Teen. I weighed 653 pounds at my heaviest, which means I was approximately 500 pounds overweight. I haven’t always been fat. The short version of the story is that my mom died and I got fat, but somehow I’m still here. This is in no way my father’s fault.

 

Two months after I was rescued, we moved to a different neighbor-hood on the other side of town. These days I can leave the house on my own. I’ve lost 302 pounds. The size of two entire people. I have around 190 left to go, and I’m fine with that. I like who I am. For one thing, I can run now. And ride in the car. And buy clothes at the mall instead of special-ordering them. And I can twirl. Aside from no longer being afraid of organ failure, that may be the best thing about now versus then.

 

Tomorrow is my first day of school since fifth grade. My new title will be high school junior, which, let’s face it, sounds a lot better than America’s Fattest Teen. But it’s hard to be anything but TERRIFIED OUT OF MY SKULL.

 

I wait for the panic attack to come.

 

 

 

 

Jack

 

 

Caroline Lushamp calls before my alarm goes off, but I let her go to voice mail. I know whatever it is, it’s not going to be good and it will be my fault.

 

She calls three times but only leaves one message. I almost delete it without listening, but what if her car broke down and she’s in trouble? This is, after all, the girl I’ve dated off and on for the past four years. (We’re that couple. That on-again, off-again everyone-assumes-we’ll-end-up-together-forever couple.)

 

Jack, it’s me. I know we’re taking a break or whatever but she’s my cousin. My COUSIN. I mean, MY COUSIN, JACK! If you wanted to get back at me for breaking up with you, then congratulations, jerkwad, you’ve done it. If you see me in class today or in the hallways or in the cafeteria or ANYWHERE ELSE ON EARTH, do not talk to me. Actually, just do me a favor and go to hell.

 

Three minutes later, the cousin calls, and at first I think she’s crying, but then you can hear Caroline in the background, and the cousin starts yelling and Caroline starts yelling. I delete the message.

 

Two minutes later, Dave Kaminski sends a text to warn me that Reed Young wants to kick my face in for making out with his girlfriend. I text, I owe you. And I mean it. If I’m keeping score, Kam’s helped me out more times than I’ve helped him.

 

All this fuss over a girl who, if we’re being honest, looked so much like Caroline Lushamp that—at least at first—I thought it was her, which means in some weird way Caroline should be flattered. It’s like admitting to the world that I want to get back together with her even though she dumped me the first week of summer so that she could go out with Zach Higgins.

 

I think of texting this to her, but instead I turn off my phone and close my eyes and see if I can’t transport myself right back into July. The only thing I had to worry about then was going to work, scavenging the local scrap yard, building (mind-blowing) projects in my (kick-ass) workshop, and hanging out with my brothers. Life would be so much easier if it was just Jack + scrap yard + kick-ass workshop + mind-blowing projects.

 

You should never have gone to the party. You should never have had a drink. You know you can’t be trusted. Avoid alcohol. Avoid crowds. Avoid people. You only end up pissing them off.

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4.6 out of 54.6 out of 5
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Top reviews from the United States

Britt Kay
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Missing the Punch of ATBP
Reviewed in the United States on February 5, 2017
3.5 stars Here''s the thing...I liked the book. It was totally fine and somewhat intriguing. It was fast paced and I found myself rooting for the characters, but it just lacked....ooomf....punch....pizazz. It seems totally unfair to an author to compare... See more
3.5 stars

Here''s the thing...I liked the book. It was totally fine and somewhat intriguing. It was fast paced and I found myself rooting for the characters, but it just lacked....ooomf....punch....pizazz.

It seems totally unfair to an author to compare their second book to their first, especially of their first was such a mega-hit, but All the Bright Places was such a shot to the gut....I kept waiting and waiting and waiting for that to happen....and it just never did.

Libby is fierce and you root for her, for sure. When she punches Jack in the cafeteria, I uttered a heck yeah! She''s been through some deep crap with her mom''s death and her unwanted celebrity status, but she''s tough and wants what she wants...but I felt like I was on a date and the author couldn''t quite close the deal.

I never felt the sexual tension. I never really bonded much with Jack at all. His story is meaningful, but it was messy and I kept hoping for his chapters to go quickly to get back to Libby.

The book was fine. My students will probably like it more than me. But that is all.
21 people found this helpful
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Sophie Riggsby
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Sweeter Ending than I Initially Expected
Reviewed in the United States on October 21, 2016
*Posted on Page Turners on 10/21/16*Libby and Jack. Two more unlikely friends or for that matter, foes. This was a difficult book to read, and I imagine it was difficult to write. Libby is a girl who is famous in her small town for one thing -- her weight. She literally had... See more
*Posted on Page Turners on 10/21/16*Libby and Jack. Two more unlikely friends or for that matter, foes. This was a difficult book to read, and I imagine it was difficult to write. Libby is a girl who is famous in her small town for one thing -- her weight. She literally had to be cut out of her own house because of a medical emergency. Jack has prosopagnosia (face blindness), which is an inability to recognize faces. They have so much in common and yet, the don''t. Libby''s world was her house, Dad, fat camps and trying to cope with her mother''s death. Jack''s world was dealing with his father''s cancer, his father''s affair (with Jack''s chem teacher) and fitting in with his friends. And then there is his constant struggle to associate features, so he can recognize his friends.

In the midst of their inner and outer struggles, Libby re-enrolls in her high school, hoping that she isn''t recognized by her former classmates. Those scenes of awkwardness and worry were written so well. Jennifer captured the inner voice of a teen girl determined to fit in and go through unrecognized and unscathed. But in a cruel twist, Jack''s friends decide to play a stupid challenge. And I do mean stupid. It literally brings the two characters together and the plot becomes intertwined in their lives.

Sure, there are some very predictable things that happen, but I still enjoyed them. I haven''t read Jennifer''s All the Bright Places, but it is on my TBR. I know fans of her writing will enjoy Holding Up the Universe, but so will people who enjoyed books that deal with characters changing their own internal dialogues and learning to be their individual selves. It''s a quick read that may take you a sitting or two to finish. I loved how Jennifer brought the loose ends of the plot around into a sweeter ending than I initially expected.
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Sasha
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Adorable
Reviewed in the United States on September 30, 2019
What would life be like if you couldn’t identify people by their facial appearance, and if this was a secret you were terrified everybody would uncover? Or what about if you were overweight and picked on because of your size and just want to be yourself? This books delves... See more
What would life be like if you couldn’t identify people by their facial appearance, and if this was a secret you were terrified everybody would uncover? Or what about if you were overweight and picked on because of your size and just want to be yourself? This books delves into these questions and holds little back. A twist on the usual YA girl meets boy story. I won’t lie and say the whole book was swoon-worthy and romantic. But it definitely had its moments and I devoured it in one weekend. Ironically my favourite quote from the book is actually a quote of a quote but it resonated with Libby and it resonates with me – “As long as you live, there’s always something waiting; and even if it’s bad, and you know it’s bad, what can you do? You can’t stop living.”
Moral of the story, keep living your best life peeps, you never know what’s just around the corner.
Follow me on Instagram for more reviews - @girlybook.nerd
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Kimbra
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
It''s worth a read
Reviewed in the United States on February 7, 2021
I picked up this book initially because of Niven''s previous novel "All the Bright Places", a pretty popular book that I really liked. Upon reading Holding Up the Universe, I was immediately skeptical. I mean, the girl Libby Strout used to weigh over 600 pounds and had to be... See more
I picked up this book initially because of Niven''s previous novel "All the Bright Places", a pretty popular book that I really liked. Upon reading Holding Up the Universe, I was immediately skeptical. I mean, the girl Libby Strout used to weigh over 600 pounds and had to be lifted out of a hole busted into her roof, and Jack Masselin has a neurological disorder where he can''t recognize people''s faces? It seemed way to farfetched and unlikely for me to take this book seriously. Yet Niven, just like in ATBP, managed to pull it off by making these out of pocket characters extremely relatable, personable, and deeply flawed. All in all, I liked this book. Did it make me sob and ponder my existence like ATBP did? No, not at all, but I don''t think that was the intention of Libby and Jack''s story. This book is about coming to terms with yourself, and as much of a cliche as that genre may be, it is still timeless.
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Kendice
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Must Read
Reviewed in the United States on October 11, 2016
I picked this book up at ALA without knowing anything about it and have since purchased a finished copy. It was on my shelf among all my other TBRs and I wasn’t rushing to it until I heard the premise behind it and some backlash Niven was receiving. I was drawn to it... See more
I picked this book up at ALA without knowing anything about it and have since purchased a finished copy. It was on my shelf among all my other TBRs and I wasn’t rushing to it until I heard the premise behind it and some backlash Niven was receiving. I was drawn to it because I’m plus size, like Libby, and have been in interracial relationships. Let me tell you something…THIS BOOK IS AMAZING.

Along the way I heard from a friend that someone had accused the author of creating characters who hated themselves. However, that was not my interpretation at all. Especially when it comes to Libby, America’s formerly fattest teen. I found her attitude and acceptance of her body-past and present-to be very inspirational. I would go as far as to say that she loved herself. THIS IS WHAT PLUS SIZE TEENS NEED TO READ. Despite being targeted by classmates, Libby didn’t let that or her weight hold her back from anything, including trying out for the dance team. A new all-time favorite passage comes from this book where Libby questions some of society’s issues with people being overweight. She says, “And this whole ‘pretty for a fat girl’ thing. I mean, what is that? Why can’t I just be pretty period? I wouldn’t say, ‘Oh, Bailey Bishop, she’s pretty for a Bible thumper.’ I mean, you’re just Bailey. And you’re pretty.”

Her counterpart, Jack, was also a well written and multi-faceted character that the reader can’t help but come to love. This was the highlight of Niven’s writing for me because it’s clear that she extensively researched prosopagnosia and brought to life some of the struggles that people with this disorder are faced with daily. Some of these situations would literally make you stress out just reading about them. I didn’t feel like his attraction to Libby was something that happened only after he “got over” her weight. He honestly seemed to think she was beautiful, weight and all. Perhaps some would say that his focus was on her personality, but I would counter that in the end, compatible personalities are the most important aspect of a successful relationship.

Overall, this book was well-written and comes with many important lessons. I didn’t even touch on the depth or all of the issues. All I can say is that I HIGHLY recommend this book.
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Andrew
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Eh. Not amazing
Reviewed in the United States on November 10, 2019
I heard lots of great things about this from some friends, but not as great as you would expect. (Note: I''m a teen) First off, let''s talk about the lack of realism. The characters seem all too open to talk about their feelings, past, and pretty much... See more
I heard lots of great things about this from some friends, but not as great as you would expect. (Note: I''m a teen)

First off, let''s talk about the lack of realism.

The characters seem all too open to talk about their feelings, past, and pretty much everything. People do not just open up about their anxiety, their problems, their struggles, to reveal everything. And yet, the characters discuss them so easily, it seems like something that is idealized by the government (as in the state health program about support and such). The openness of the dialogue renders the heavy topics they discuss less meaningful.

Next, the dialogue felt, off. Listening to normal conversations, you see indicators of nervousness, of concern, anxiety, self-consciousness. The dialogue between Libby and Jack are, to say the least, were lacking all these indicators. Again, Libby has anxiety about her body, and her past. However, in many conversations with Jack and other characters, she seems to drop all of it and talks like a confident witty teen.

In addition, the characters got into such ridiculous plots and complications that I was shocked. People do not go posing around in a bikini handing out a couple hundred copies of flyers. It is so idealized to the point that I react with "What the heck. Man." And ''Fat Girl Rodeo?'' Seriously? It is so juvenile and asinine that it is utterly ridiculous. The parents seem to be very hands off. I mean, Libby''s dad is supposed to be caring dad, and yet he doesn''t pry more into when they skip (correct my memory, sorry if the event is wrong). Another time would be when Jack announces his prosopagnosia to the crowd by going up to I believe the DJ and screaming at the crowd. This is something similar to what I thought of myself when writing a story that was absolute trash when I was ten. Announcing the problem and hopefully all is resolved was the approach Niven took, which is absolutely ridiculous. The sheer amount of fistfights the students got into shocked me. I understand the author is attempting to create a teen romance out of a troubled life, but are fistfights truly common occurrences?

Finally, predictability. SPOILER ALERT (You may want to not continue reading if you want to purchase the book).

Jack being diagnosed with severe prosopagnosia by a doctor. They claim that he will never be able to recognize someone (at least that''s the gist of it) and - bam! - he can recognize Libby. Great. Somehow by some magic force his prosopagnosia is cured only for one person. Once again, I must complain. Is this truly that good of an ending? No. Not at all. Oh my gosh! He realizes he loves her and he recognizes her. It is the epitome of a cheesy romance and contradicts all previous statements. But forget those details. It''s not problem whatsoever! It''s a teen romance, after all! It felt like the story had the ending written first and everything else was sorta made up later.

Overall, not as amazing as expected. Nothing like All the Bright Places. Feels rushed. Unique setup, but unrealistic character development and sometimes basic love description/indicators. I would say on the surface, this is a nice story of love, but looking deeper you can see the quality has considerably dropped compared to All the Bright Places.
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Chels
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I have to say that I really did enjoy this book
Reviewed in the United States on May 22, 2017
Ok so this review might be a little all over the place so please stick with my while I try and sort out my thoughts on this book. First, I have to say that I really did enjoy this book. I can agree with some people on how parts of the story are problematic, and I''ll get to... See more
Ok so this review might be a little all over the place so please stick with my while I try and sort out my thoughts on this book. First, I have to say that I really did enjoy this book. I can agree with some people on how parts of the story are problematic, and I''ll get to that, but as a whole I was entertained until the very end, and that''s what I like to get from my books I read. I didn''t think that the couple of problems with this book ruined it at all and I found the story to be cute, which again is something I want from my contemporary reads, and for once I wasn''t able to predict everything that was going to happen before it happened.

Now being an overweight person myself, I have to say the way that Libby views herself is beyond relatable. I know that I''ve seen people that have a problem with how she views herself and about how often she thinks about her weight and the fact that she''s supposed to be this force for self love at the same time. But come on, this is how a teenage girls brain works. Even now as an adult that''s how my brain works. I go from one day hating everything about the way I look to the next thinking I''m the cutest thing in the world and everyone can just suck it. Maybe because I can put myself in her shoes it makes it easier for me to understand how her brain can work that way, but it''s really accurate and spoke to me on a high level.

Oh Jack. I''m not sure where to start with Jack. I have to say even though he has prospoga.....you know what, EVERY TIME I came to this word in the book it took me like 5 minutes to figure out how to pronounce it again, so I''m just not going to use it here. Anyway, even with Jack''s neurological disorder I have to say he really is a douchey boy. Granted I felt some sympathy for him but then there were times he''d do or say something and I''d just think "Come on, Really?". But then again I can see that that is how he''s supposed to be written and that''s probably the reaction we''re supposed to have with him.

Let''s talk about the insta love for just a second. Sure that''s usually a thing that happens with contemporaries, you meet someone and bam you''re in love. Granted Libby and Jack knew each other before the insta love happened but you can literally see it suddenly happen where all of a sudden Jack looks different to Libby and he''s a dreamy boy. It wasn''t so glaring wrong that I wasn''t able to move past it, but I do feel that that situation could have been handled a little differently.

Back to Jack''s neurological disorder. I still don''t fully understand how it all works and how he''s able to tell Libby apart from everyone else so easily. It does seem like a Love Cures Everything kind of deal but when I think about it, maybe love could cure prosp.....whatever. Maybe having that connection with someone, a connection so strong that you''re not scared to look in to their eyes, can cause something else to fire in the brain that helps remember what their face looks like. So yet again, even though I can see this as being problematic, it still kind of makes sense to me and does add to the story.

All in all this was a very enjoyable read. I loved getting to see Libby make that transition from homeschooled loaner to being more comfortable in her skin and going to a normal high school and trying to make friends and start a relationship. I enjoyed getting to follow Jack and see that maybe the douchey act he puts on is just a front because he has no idea how to act since no one really knows about his problem and he''s too scared to really tell anyone. I am a sucker for contemporaries and the fact that this one touched on a couple hard topics made me an even bigger sucker for it. I''d recommend this to pretty much anyone looking for a good and entertaining read.
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MYOB2
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Plot was very well written
Reviewed in the United States on September 30, 2019
This was an excellent read. The storyline was good and didnt have many dull moments. The characters were developed very well. I liked the mystery behind Jack''s past, without revealing too much detail. I hope this is turned into a movie. The only thing I didnt... See more
This was an excellent read. The storyline was good and didnt have many dull moments. The characters were developed very well. I liked the mystery behind Jack''s past, without revealing too much detail. I hope this is turned into a movie.

The only thing I didnt like about this was the cursing. Definitely not a book for young kids. Very much a young Adult book.
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Top reviews from other countries

Arun kumar
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A refreshing read from a trusted author
Reviewed in India on July 9, 2019
#BookReview ~ Name of the book: Holding Up The Universe Author: Jennifer Niven (@jenniferniven ) My Rating: 🌟🌟🌟🌟.5/5 ~ I picked this book up because Jennifer Niven had my heart when I read All The Bright Places all those years ago. If you asked me to pick out a reason...See more
#BookReview ~ Name of the book: Holding Up The Universe Author: Jennifer Niven (@jenniferniven ) My Rating: 🌟🌟🌟🌟.5/5 ~ I picked this book up because Jennifer Niven had my heart when I read All The Bright Places all those years ago. If you asked me to pick out a reason as to why I love her work, it would be because she writes about things that matter and she writes it in a way that make them matter to YOU. I had ATBP when I had no clue about mental health disorders and I still felt it. That''s what good writing does to you. Makes you feel what you cannot. ~ Coming back to Holding Up The Universe, I loved it for two reasons: the characters and the character development. This book is about Libby Strout and Jack Masselin. Libby Strout is America''s fattest teen and Jack Masselin has prosopagnosia (face blindness). Their story is naked and vulnerable because you''ll feel the humiliation and you''ll feel the struggle. Libby and Jack have a rough start but they''re both compassionate, both outlaws so they fall for each other. There''s sunshine and roses until there isn''t. ~ Through Jack I could only imagine how difficult it would be not to remember faces and not recognize people except by identifiers. When Jack says "You deserve to be seen" I know he means it. Libby is brave and Libby will take you out. She''s the kind of character we all wish we knew because she fight body shaming. At one point Libby says "My only crime was that I was fat" and that''s the best line in the book. This book made me hopeful, made me think that there is an end to bullying and body shaming and all the horrible things people do to feel about themselves. Hope is what takes us forward. ~ Things I liked: 📚Characters - real, naked, lovable 📚Focused on character development than plot 📚Seeing through Jack''s eyes 📚Realistic, nondramatic situations that''ll feel natural 📚Didn''t end in suicide and that brought hope (mental health books can have an impact without the characters dying) ~ Things I didn''t like: 📚The fact that it probably could have had a little more story to it but that''s find ~Do I recommend? Yes! If you like reading about things that matter, then yes.
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Lauren
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I loved everything except for the unrealistic scenarios.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 8, 2020
I have mixed feelings on this book. On the one hand, I thoroughly enjoyed the writing style and the pacing of the book and thought the plot line was great. I also enjoyed reading about the male protagonists life and about the issues this book presents (bullying, eating...See more
I have mixed feelings on this book. On the one hand, I thoroughly enjoyed the writing style and the pacing of the book and thought the plot line was great. I also enjoyed reading about the male protagonists life and about the issues this book presents (bullying, eating disorders, and more). However, I found some of the situations and responses highly unrealistic (although I will admit I’ve never been to an American school so if it’s like that there then fair enough) and I found it hard to sympathise with the female protagonist since the way she responded to things felt too perfect and unlikely given the age of the character and the things she’s dealt with. All in all I would recommend reading this book especially if you like the author (I can’t comment on how well it compares to her other books). It was a quick read and was still incredibly captivating and I do believe people who are going through similar issues as the protagonists may enjoy it a lot more than I did. I still love it, I just didn’t love the female protagonist and I do believe it would be ideal for those between 13-15 ( I as a 17 year old wasn’t as keen on it as I would have been at a younger age ) however, if you’re buying for someone else be wary that there is some profanity in. Nothing extremely offensive, but still there.
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Kym Hamer
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Unusual & heart-warming protagonist
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 5, 2021
The plot is a bit of a stretch but an unusual and heart-warming protagonist in Libby Strout really transforms this from a typical boy-meets-girl coming of age story into a really enjoyable read. 4 stars
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Aman Rana
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Read this before you buy 🙋‍♂️
Reviewed in India on February 5, 2021
✒️ Story is about two character LIBBY & JACK both comes from different back ground but still there is something common in between them. LIBBY who become America''s fattest kid after her mom died, she faced a kind of depression when she was 8 years old and she just start...See more
✒️ Story is about two character LIBBY & JACK both comes from different back ground but still there is something common in between them. LIBBY who become America''s fattest kid after her mom died, she faced a kind of depression when she was 8 years old and she just start eating alot and as in result she become fattest kid of America. She has been rescued from her house. Copes broke her house to take her out from it. Now every body in her town knows her, she got so many threating emails, latters, texts even her dad got to. Where JACK who is hottest guy of school for everyone has different personality which he hides from everyone. Also he was facing face blindness in which he can''t remember people''s face, the second thing is nobody knows about it, he hides his problem from his family, friends and everyone. After lossing hundreds of pound weight when Libby joins school, she face many problems like bulling, getting insult from everyone, pranks and that''s how she met Jack. ( On first meeting she punched him on his face ) Jack realise it was his mistake and toke responsibility for it, Libby and he slowly become friends, he found he had never met girl like her, she is so strong from inside. And they fell for each other. Story has many more things. What i like so much is Libby, she is really an inspirational character. She is brave, she know how to deal with people who hate her without any reason, she is kind, understanding, helpful and many more things. Everyone should read this book. This book inspire us to not give up on own self no matter if the world is hating you. They way this book is written is also good, easy to understand, simple language well explain things. Even if you are beginner pick this.
12 people found this helpful
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Emily-Mae
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not for older teens
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 5, 2017
Good book for younger teenagers, but was too simplistic to be for young adults.
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