Eat wholesale a Peach: A high quality Memoir online sale

Eat wholesale a Peach: A high quality Memoir online sale

Eat wholesale a Peach: A high quality Memoir online sale

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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • From the chef behind Momofuku and star of Netflix’s Ugly Delicious—an intimate account of the making of a chef, the story of the modern restaurant world that he helped shape, and how he discovered that success can be much harder to understand than failure.

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY NPR • FortuneParade • The New York Public Library • Garden & Gun

In 2004, Momofuku Noodle Bar opened in a tiny, stark space in Manhattan’s East Village. Its young chef-owner, David Chang, worked the line, serving ramen and pork buns to a mix of fellow restaurant cooks and confused diners whose idea of ramen was instant noodles in Styrofoam cups. It would have been impossible to know it at the time—and certainly Chang would have bet against himself—but he, who had failed at almost every endeavor in his life, was about to become one of the most influential chefs of his generation, driven by the question, “What if the underground could become the mainstream?”
 
Chang grew up the youngest son of a deeply religious Korean American family in Virginia. Graduating college aimless and depressed, he fled the States for Japan, hoping to find some sense of belonging. While teaching English in a backwater town, he experienced the highs of his first full-blown manic episode, and began to think that the cooking and sharing of food could give him both purpose and agency in his life.

Full of grace, candor, grit, and humor, Eat a Peach chronicles Chang’s switchback path. He lays bare his mistakes and wonders about his extraordinary luck as he recounts the improbable series of events that led him to the top of his profession. He wrestles with his lifelong feelings of otherness and inadequacy, explores the mental illness that almost killed him, and finds hope in the shared value of deliciousness. Along the way, Chang gives us a penetrating look at restaurant life, in which he balances his deep love for the kitchen with unflinching honesty about the industry’s history of brutishness and its uncertain future.

Review

“With humor, pathos and heaping spoonsful of self-deprecation . . . Eat a Peach is an honest, ugly, raw dish of a book.” —The Wall Street Journal
 
“An honest and vulnerable autobiography that will have you laughing and crying at the same time . . . an absolute must-read.” —CNN

“David Chang is one of the most beloved chefs on earth, but his inspiring memoir is not just for foodies. He’s one of the most audaciously openhearted and honest humans you’ll ever find. This book is for anyone who has ever felt like an underdog or an underachiever—or aspires to become an entrepreneur or a more decent person.” —Adam Grant, New York Times bestselling author of Originals and Give and Take, and host of the TED podcast WorkLife

Eat a Peach is not merely an autobiography of a great creative; rather, it’s a compelling philosophy of a man who believes in a beautiful life beyond reach. It is profoundly gratifying to witness Chang marching uphill, step by step, toward his sublime vision. As Chang suffers, rages, and fights for his quest, we can’t help but admire his vulnerability, courage, and conviction.” —Min Jin Lee, author of Free Food for Millionaires and Pachinko, a finalist for the National Book Award

“Dave Chang’s writing is honest and vulnerable. As a child of immigrants, the DNA of his story spoke to me. Now I just have to keep up with his drive and tenacity!” —Hasan Minhaj, host of Patriot Act with Hasan Minhaj

“If you’re looking for a cookbook, this is a terrible choice. Herein you will find the recipe for one of our brightest, most energetic, talented, and inspiring Americans (who also happens to be a chef). David Chang is a great storyteller with a great story to tell.” —Jimmy Kimmel, host of Jimmy Kimmel Live!
 
“This is one of the most compelling chef memoirs in recent memory. . . . Chang’s writing is engaging and his story is stirring, humorous, and compulsively readable.” —Shondaland
 
“Just like the food from his famed Momofuku restaurants is must-devour, Chang’s memoir is a must-read.” —E! News

“David Chang is one of the world’s most creative chefs, but it wasn’t obvious he would become that. I was absolutely enthralled by his underdog story, which he tells with passion, humor, and skill. Don’t miss this incredible memoir!” —Brian Grazer, New York Times bestselling author of A Curious Mind and cofounder of Imagine Entertainment

“An entertaining, admirably candid self-assessment of life in the foodie fast lane.” —Kirkus Reviews

“Foodies and chefs alike will dig into Chang’s searing memoir.” Publishers Weekly (starred review)

About the Author

David Chang is the chef and founder of Momofuku. Since opening Momofuku Noodle Bar in New York City in 2004, he has been honored with six James Beard Awards, including Outstanding Chef, and has been recognized as a Time 100 honoree. His cookbook,  Momofuku, is a  New York Times bestseller. In 2018, David founded Majordomo Media and launched The Dave Chang Show podcast. He is the host of two Netflix original documentary series,  Ugly Delicious and  Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

With the benefit of many years of consultation with a professional therapist, I can tell you that what I was experiencing toward the end of my time at Café Boulud was my first full-blown experience with the depressive phase of bipolar disorder. As simply as I can put it, bipolar disorder is characterized by dramatic swings between high (manic) and low (depressive) states. This particular low lasted for several months and was the longest and most intense I’ve ever endured. But again, I can only tell you that in hindsight. At the time, all I knew was that everything felt shitty and I couldn’t pinpoint a specific reason. I felt dislodged personally and professionally. Things I could always count on, like my palate, were failing me. It didn’t seem normal to feel this way.

High school was where I first noticed that something was off. I’d spoken to the in-house therapist a few times, but I stopped because I didn’t really feel comfortable spilling my guts to someone who had lunch with my teachers seven days a week. Instead I wrote about everything going on in my head. One day, my roommate dug through my computer and mocked me mercilessly for what he found. I saw another counselor in college. It took him two minutes to pull out the prescription pad and prescribe me Paxil. I never took it and I never saw him again.

I was embarrassed. I didn’t feel justified in seeing a therapist or taking pills. For one thing, I didn’t know any other Asian people who saw therapists. A lot of my friends had shrinks in college, but their situations were different. They were wealthy kids with actual bad shit going on at home in Westchester or whatever northeastern enclave had produced them. Rich kids are always the most f***ed up. I didn’t recognize my issues in anyone else.

At Trinity, I grew acutely aware of my otherness. The girls at school were mostly white and therefore off-limits. I’d seen how my parents reacted when my siblings had tried dating non-Koreans, and it wasn’t pretty. Not that it would have mattered. The white girls at school were explicit in their pronouncements that they would never be seen with an Asian man. And so, aside from random drunken hookups, I never dated anyone in college. For years, any kind of meaningful relationship I had was one I found during the summer or while traveling abroad. I simply felt more comfortable somewhere else.

For a minute, I thought I’d attend divinity school after Trinity, but my grades weren’t good enough to get me into a graduate program, much less one of the cushy jobs that my classmates were landing in New York. I didn’t know what else to do with myself, so I showed up to a postgrad career fair and signed up to teach English in Japan, because the booth was closest to the door. I’d come to think that my problems were in America, and I wanted to live the life of an expat. Being away from home would be a fresh start, a chance for reinvention. I fled the States with the intention of being gone for good. 


Cut to the cross-country track behind the high school in Izumi-Tottori and the largest Asian man within thirty miles running around and around and loving it: my first encounter with the highs of a manic episode, and the other side of bipolar disorder. I had boundless energy. I felt invincible. At night, I read dense Russian classics, plowing through the entire canon. I finished War and Peace in a couple of days. 

I had originally requested an assignment in cold, northern Sapporo. The company sent me to this steamy town in Wakayama Prefecture instead. Imagine Jacksonville, only hotter. At night, I would hear wannabe yakuza riding their dirt bikes and motorcycles around the rice paddy that was my backyard. Most of my students were either the wives of organized criminals or kids prepping for college entrance exams. Once they realized that their English grammar was better than mine, they started using my class as an opportunity to nap. I lived in an apartment with my boss, next to a dorm for Jehovah’s Witnesses, and I don’t think I had a full night of sleep the entire time I was there. 

I’d hoped to find something in Japan—a sense of belonging, maybe. No such luck. The women in Japan were no more inclined to date me than the women at Trinity. All the Japanese girls seemed to be paired up with a white guy. If not, they certainly weren’t going to stoop to dating a Korean.

I did a little traveling while there, and saw that many of the Koreans living in Japan were downtrodden or wrapped up in gambling and shadier professions. Finding vandalism on the monuments to Koreans who died in Hiroshima was an early lesson in racism’s ubiquity.

I’d always assumed Japan was a country of extraordinary punctuality, but the train would sometimes be late in Izumi-Tottori. I learned that the delays were caused by people jumping on the tracks, even though the government did everything it could to prevent it. They announced that they would fine the families of the deceased. They painted the station a calming pastel yellow. None of it seemed to have an effect.

Between Tolstoy and Dostoyevsky, I read Camus. I spent a lot of time mulling over his famous quote about finding an “invincible summer” within himself. I wondered about the car crash that ended his life, when he took a ride with a notoriously bad driver. When they examined his body, they found a train ticket in his pocket. Did he maybe want to get in that accident?

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4.6 out of 54.6 out of 5
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Top reviews from the United States

Linda
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
David Chang''s Memoir Is Food for Thought (terrible pun but I can''t help it!)
Reviewed in the United States on September 29, 2020
I first came to know about David Chang when my niece took me to eat at his Momofuku Noodle Bar in NYC''s East Village in the early 2000''s. I thought of him only in terms of the spare look of the (tiny) restaurant and the delicious Asian-inspired food. Then I accidentally... See more
I first came to know about David Chang when my niece took me to eat at his Momofuku Noodle Bar in NYC''s East Village in the early 2000''s. I thought of him only in terms of the spare look of the (tiny) restaurant and the delicious Asian-inspired food. Then I accidentally came across The Mind of a Chef on PBS. Chang was the featured chef in season one (and according to his memoir, was the originator of the series). I found him to be an original, innovative, wide-ranging, deep thinker and an excellent, engaging communicator and so have followed his career ever since. His memoir, Eat a Peach, is a chronicle of his life in food as a chef, restauranteur, tv star, podcaster, author, colleague/mentor, but even more so it is a set of brutally honest yet eloquent reflections on his struggle to continuously develop as a human being. Chang doesn''t mention Socrates, but I''m sure he believes that the "unexamined life is not worth living." In Eat a Peach, we read that his bipolarism, difficult relationship with his father, and close friendship with Anthony Bourdain (who appeared to live with similar demons and ended his life by committing suicide) seem to drive Chang to question his considerable success with not a small degree of self-flagellation but, thankfully, with a great sense of humor and exceptional generosity towards young chefs as well. Written in a fast-paced conversational style (with the help of Gabe Ulla and Chris Ying), the book addresses the existential question of "Who am I?" Because Chang''s life is a remarkable one, the book is a fascinating read.
28 people found this helpful
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Robert
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
One of my favorite memoirs ever - and I read a lot of them
Reviewed in the United States on October 11, 2020
At first, David Chang''s self-deprecating prose seemed like cliche humble bragging. As he wrote of his life and his intertwining journeys with his restaurant empire, mental wellness, race and gender, family, et. al., the writing morphed into sincerity - someone being real in... See more
At first, David Chang''s self-deprecating prose seemed like cliche humble bragging. As he wrote of his life and his intertwining journeys with his restaurant empire, mental wellness, race and gender, family, et. al., the writing morphed into sincerity - someone being real in real-time. Chapter 15, entitled "35", might be the best chapter ever written in a memoir.
You don''t need to be a foodie to read this. Chang shares lessons on leadership, management, parenting, and life in general through his own lens, processed, practiced, and reflected upon. Read this book.
19 people found this helpful
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david
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Meh
Reviewed in the United States on October 30, 2020
Overall, this book is just okay. I generally enjoy memoirs from "celebrity chefs" because I find the restaurant business from the outside to be compelling. Eat a Peach started out great with the glimpse into David Chang''s childhood, but the early days starting up his... See more
Overall, this book is just okay. I generally enjoy memoirs from "celebrity chefs" because I find the restaurant business from the outside to be compelling. Eat a Peach started out great with the glimpse into David Chang''s childhood, but the early days starting up his restaurant was not was strong, in my opinion. It seemed to be going through the motions storytelling more than anything else. That being said, toward the end there is a terrific story about a night Chang spent with the late, great Anthony Bourdain that is almost worth the price of admission. I also enjoyed the section at the close of the book where Chang offers advice to aspiring chefs. Even though that advice is largely to choose something else as a career, it was one of my favorite parts of the book.
16 people found this helpful
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Lee M
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Best book of the year. Sad it had to end!
Reviewed in the United States on October 8, 2020
This was the best autobiography I''ve read in the past two years, next to Michelle Obama''s Becoming - it is SO well written, casual, humorous, self-deprecating, HONEST... I could not put it down. I was truly sad that it ended. Whether you''re a foodie / chef or an average... See more
This was the best autobiography I''ve read in the past two years, next to Michelle Obama''s Becoming - it is SO well written, casual, humorous, self-deprecating, HONEST... I could not put it down. I was truly sad that it ended. Whether you''re a foodie / chef or an average joe, you will LOVE this book. ORDER IT
12 people found this helpful
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Kindle Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
5 Stars
Reviewed in the United States on September 13, 2020
A wonderful autobiography that you won''t want to put down. The style of the book is an easy read-as if you are sitting down with David Chang ; learning who David Chang is, his personal growth, as well as the thinking behind his successful restaurants.
9 people found this helpful
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Best Food & Beverage book to Date
Reviewed in the United States on September 25, 2020
I’m a cook for 14 years. This is one the best books about personal vulnerabilities and the high character that drive chefs to success. There is a reason why David Chang is a wild success. I especially like his stories about mentoring. It’s a special talent that few have.... See more
I’m a cook for 14 years. This is one the best books about personal vulnerabilities and the high character that drive chefs to success. There is a reason why David Chang is a wild success. I especially like his stories about mentoring. It’s a special talent that few have. His admonition stock future chefs at the end of his book are spot on.
7 people found this helpful
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Ann Marie Norrid
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Perfect chef memoir
Reviewed in the United States on March 15, 2021
This book was just as incredible as I thought it would be! I’ve always fangirled a bit about Momofuku’s chef, but after reading his book, I see it was 100% justified. David Chang talks about everything you want to read about in a chef’s book - behind the scenes... See more
This book was just as incredible as I thought it would be! I’ve always fangirled a bit about Momofuku’s chef, but after reading his book, I see it was 100% justified.

David Chang talks about everything you want to read about in a chef’s book - behind the scenes kitchen snafus, the history of all his restaurant openings, paying his dues in other kitchens, mental health struggles, hilarious footnotes (my jam 🙌🏼), and FOOD. So much glorious food.

Our author really delves into the challenges of being an Asian chef. Are people mad he’s not making more upscale Korean food? Why doesn’t he fit the stereotype of “the smart Asian kid?” Do they think he’s being “too Asian?” From growing up feeling isolated from his peers to figuring out his take on his culture’s cuisine, he does not shy away from facing these race struggles head on.

This book definitely has an irreverent Kitchen Confidential sort of vibe too. In fact, Chang mentions Bourdain several times in the book. I’ve started watching a few episodes of Chang’s show Ugly Delicious and I’m enjoying all the attention he pays to underdog foods that often don’t get much praise.

What is it about chef books that simultaneously makes me want to drop everything and join a fancy fast-paced restaurant while also wanting to sprint away as fast as I can in the opposite direction? How does it make me want to splurge on a 5-course meal, but also exhaust me to the point of just wanting to eat a bowl of cereal? 🤷🏼‍♀️

If you love memoirs (yes), gorgeous covers (for sure), and food (duh) you must give this book a read.
2 people found this helpful
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Chang’s book is peachy!!! Loved it!!
Reviewed in the United States on November 10, 2020
I love reading memoirs and am a foodie, so I found this book riveting! Chang’s story is strong and clear and he’s not afraid of showing his rough edges. It is his grit that has largely led to his success, rather than perfection. As an artist, teacher, and creative I highly... See more
I love reading memoirs and am a foodie, so I found this book riveting! Chang’s story is strong and clear and he’s not afraid of showing his rough edges. It is his grit that has largely led to his success, rather than perfection. As an artist, teacher, and creative I highly identified with this theme that he explores throughout the book. That is, how creativity, innovation, and authenticity were his main ingredients to his passion, which have led to his success. I highly recommend this book to anyone looking to explore their art or passion with fresh eyes.
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Top reviews from other countries

Rodrigo GK
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
David Chang is great
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 26, 2021
Vulnerable and Raw, super fast-paced. It is a fun read with some heavy reflections, just like all David Chang touches.
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Jonathan
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Neither a great memoir nor food book
Reviewed in Canada on November 8, 2020
I wanted to love this book, as I''m a fan of David Chang, his food empire, and even his TV shows. Unfortunately the book is kind of all over the place. First, the obligatory and rather unremarkable childhood memories that don''t really connect to what comes later (to be fair,...See more
I wanted to love this book, as I''m a fan of David Chang, his food empire, and even his TV shows. Unfortunately the book is kind of all over the place. First, the obligatory and rather unremarkable childhood memories that don''t really connect to what comes later (to be fair, Chang admits as much as he''s describing it all). Then, a rather scattered, confusing, conflicting account of what Chang thinks he did right and wrong while setting up Momofuku and the restaurants that came later. Lots of mea culpa musings over his anger issues - at turns apologetic and defensive - but mostly coming across as just excuses for bad behaviour, and after a while a just repetitive. In between all of that, he talks a lot about his struggles with depression and how this impacted his journey. This was interesting to a point, but not that different than so many other accounts of depression and (mild) addiction. As for the writing, it just isn''t very good, which I found surprising given that Chang employs a co-writer here (Gabe Ulla), which seems to be the point of that sort of collaboration. All in all, there were some interesting parts, juicy tidbits, thoughtful musings on the industry and an insightful list of chef Dos and Don''ts at the end. And Chang does his sincere best to explain himself to those who care to listen. But this won''t stand out as either a powerful memoir or influential food book.
3 people found this helpful
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Sarah
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great book!
Reviewed in Canada on December 24, 2020
This book is not a feel good, let me give you tips on home cooking, book. This is an honest look at Dave Chang''s life and his trials and tribulations. I listen to his podcast so I knew what to expect. He opens up and is honest about his darkest moments and how things need...See more
This book is not a feel good, let me give you tips on home cooking, book. This is an honest look at Dave Chang''s life and his trials and tribulations. I listen to his podcast so I knew what to expect. He opens up and is honest about his darkest moments and how things need to change inside and outside the kitchen. I think it is a must read.
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LC
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A must have
Reviewed in Canada on December 17, 2020
A must read book for any David Chang fan. It was a quick read that I couldn''t put down. Pretty fast paced and very interesting. Also up to date with his most recent struggles (2020) which was interesting to read about.
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amwod
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Love this Book!
Reviewed in Canada on November 23, 2020
Worth the read! I struggle with mental health issues and found it really inspiring to read about a successful person who also does. I have loved Dave Chang for years and this just made me love him even more.
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Eat wholesale a Peach: A high quality Memoir online sale

Eat wholesale a Peach: A high quality Memoir online sale

Eat wholesale a Peach: A high quality Memoir online sale

Eat wholesale a Peach: A high quality Memoir online sale

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Eat wholesale a Peach: A high quality Memoir online sale

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Eat wholesale a Peach: A high quality Memoir online sale

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Eat wholesale a Peach: A high quality Memoir online sale

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