As Bright lowest wholesale as Heaven outlet sale

As Bright lowest wholesale as Heaven outlet sale

As Bright lowest wholesale as Heaven outlet sale

Description

Product Description

From the acclaimed author of The Last Year of the War comes a novel set during the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918, telling the story of a family reborn through loss and love.

In 1918, Philadelphia was a city teeming with promise. Even as its young men went off to fight in the Great War, there were opportunities for a fresh start on its cobblestone streets. Into this bustling town, came Pauline Bright and her husband, filled with hope that they could now give their three daughters—Evelyn, Maggie, and Willa—a chance at a better life.

But just months after they arrive, the Spanish Flu reaches the shores of America. As the pandemic claims more than twelve thousand victims in their adopted city, they find their lives left with a world that looks nothing like the one they knew. But even as they lose loved ones, they take in a baby orphaned by the disease who becomes their single source of hope. Amidst the tragedy and challenges, they learn what they cannot live without—and what they are willing to do about it.

As Bright as Heaven is the compelling story of a mother and her daughters who find themselves in a harsh world not of their making, which will either crush their resolve to survive or purify it.

Review

Praise for As Bright as Heaven

“A story of one family’s heartbreak and hope. Strong [and] resilient, Meissner’s characters step off the page and into history.”—Lisa Wingate, New York Times bestselling author of Before We Were Yours

“A family saga, coming-of-age tale, and riveting historical fiction all in one. A must read!”—Pam Jenoff, New York Times bestselling author of The Orphan''s Tale

“A thoughtful examination of life...somber, gripping, and illuminated with hope.”—Kate Quinn,  USA Today bestselling author of  The Alice Network

“Traces of Little Women in the trials and fortitude of the Bright women. An affirmation of the power of love and duty.”—Helen Simonson, author of Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand and The Summer Before the War

“A fascinating historical novel and a beautifully written story of love, loss, and family. A gorgeous, unforgettable book.”—Jillian Cantor, author of Margot and The Lost Letter

About the Author

Susan Meissner is a former managing editor of a weekly newspaper and an award-winning columnist. She is the award-winning author of A Fall of Marigolds, Secrets of a Charmed Life, Stars over Sunset Boulevard, and A Bridge Across the Ocean among other novels.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Chapter 1

January 1918

Pauline

Morning light shimmers on the apricot horizon as I stand at the place where my baby boy rests. Stouthearted chickadees are singing in the day, just like they have done every other winter''s dawn, but when this same sun sets tonight, I will be miles away from them, and inside an unfamiliar house. There will be no reminders anywhere that Henry was ever mine. Not visible ones, anyway.

I kneel on the dead grass, brittle with icy moisture. The fabric of my skirt draws in the chilled damp, as if it is parched with thirst. The growing wetness at my knees is unhurried and easy, like a clean, slow blade. I look at the little marble slab that bears Henry''s name and the carving of a sweet lamb curled up among lilies, and I''m reminded again that he was my angel child, even before he flew away to heaven.

From the moment I held my boy, glistening and new, I knew that he wasn''t like the other babies I''d given birth to. He wasn''t like my girls. They''d slipped out annoyed by the noise and chill and sharp edges of this world. Not Henry. He didn''t cry. He didn''t curl his tiny hands into fists. He didn''t shout his displeasure at being pulled out of the only safe place he knew.

When the doctor placed him in my arms, Henry merely looked at me with eyes so blue they could''ve been sapphires. He held my gaze like he knew who I was. Knew everything about me. Like he still had the breath of eternity in his lungs.

He didn''t care when I parted the folds of his blanket to look at his maleness and marvel at the pearly sheen of his skin against mine. I could scarcely believe I''d given birth to a boy after three girls and so many years since the last one. I just kept staring at Henry and he just let me.

When Thomas was let into the room, he was as astonished that we had a son as I was. The girls were, too. They followed in right after their father, even though it was the middle of the night, and we all gazed and grinned at the little man-child, the quiet lad who did not cry.

My father-in-law came over the next morning, as did Thomas''s brothers and their wives, all of them smelling of dried tobacco leaves and spice. My parents came, too, and my sister, Jane, who was newly pregnant with her own child after several years of hoping and praying for a baby. They all marveled at how beautiful Henry was, how calm, how enchanting his gaze and how sweet his temperament. My mother and Thomas''s sisters-in-law stared at him like I''d done the night before, amazed as I had been at how serene this baby was. They had known, too, without knowing, that something wasn''t right.

The few months we had with Henry were wonder filled and happy. He did all the things a baby does that make you smile and laugh and want to kiss his downy head. When he needed something, like my breast or a clean diaper or affection, he didn''t wail; he merely sighed a sweet little sound that if it were made of words would have started with "If it''s not too much trouble . . ." We didn''t know he didn''t have the physical strength to exert himself. His perfectly formed outsides hid the too-small, too-weak heart that my body had made for him.

And yet had God asked me ahead of time if I wanted this sweet child for just shy of half a year, I still would have said yes. Even now, eight weeks after Henry''s passing, and even when I hold Jane''s sweet little newborn, Curtis, I would still say yes.

I don''t know if Thomas feels this way, and I know the girls don''t. Evelyn is still sad, Maggie is still angry, and Willa is still bewildered that Henry was taken from us. I can''t say why I am none of those things anymore. What I feel inside, I''m not sure there are words to describe. I should still be sad, angry, and bewildered, but instead I feel a numbness regarding Death that I''ve told no one about. Not even Thomas.

I no longer fear Death, though I know that I should. I''m strangely at peace with what I used to think of as my enemy. Living seems more the taskmaster of the two, doesn''t it? Life is wonderful and beautiful but oh, how hard it can be. Dying, by contrast, is easy and simple, almost gentle. But who can I tell such a thing to? No one. I am troubled by how remarkable this feeling is.

This is why I changed my mind about moving to Philadelphia. I''d said no the first time Thomas''s uncle made his offer even though I could tell my husband was interested. Back then I couldn''t imagine leaving this sleepy little town where I''ve lived all my life, couldn''t imagine leaving my parents, though I''ve never been especially dependent on their subtle shows of affection. I didn''t want to move to the city, where the war in Europe would somehow seem closer, didn''t want to uproot the girls from the only home they''ve ever known. Didn''t want to tear myself away from all that was familiar. Uncle Fred wrote again a couple months after Henry was born, and Thomas had said we needed to think carefully before turning down a second invitation.

"Uncle Fred might take his offer to one of my brothers," Thomas had told me.

I truly would have given the matter more serious thought if Henry hadn''t begun his slow ascent away from us right about the same time. When my son''s fragile heart finally began to number his days, nothing else mattered but holding on to him as long as we could. Thomas didn''t bring up the matter again when the third letter from Uncle Fred arrived last week. My husband thinks I cannot leave this little mound of grass.

But the truth is, I have come out from under the shroud of sorrow a different person. I no longer want to stay in this place where Henry spent such a short time. I don''t want Thomas shading a view of the wide horizon with hands calloused from binder leaves. I don''t want the girls to end up mirroring this life of mine, in a place where nothing truly changes but the contours of your heart.

More than that, I want to know why Death seems to walk beside me like a companion now rather than prowling behind like a shadowy specter. Surely the answers await me in Uncle Fred''s funeral parlor, where he readies the deceased for their journeys home. Thomas would''ve gone to his grave rolling cigars for other men to smoke, but now he will one day inherit Uncle Fred''s mortuary business and then he won''t be under the thumb of anyone.

I don''t know what it is like to be the wife of an undertaker. I only know that I need to remember how it was to keep Death at a distance.

I kneel, kiss my fingertips, and brush them against the H carved into the cold stone.

And I rise from the wet ground without saying good-bye.

Chapter 2

Maggie

I will miss the curing barn in autumn, when the tobacco leaves hang from the laths like golden skirts in a wardrobe. I''ve always loved how in October the papery leaves smell like cedar, molasses, and tree bark. There won''t be anything like them in Philadelphia. And we''ll be long gone by the time October comes around again.

The curing barn is my favorite place because it''s either as busy as a beehive or as still as a painting. After that first killing frost it''s like the painting, so still and quiet you can forget there''s a changing world outside. No one has to do anything in the curing barn in the fall except have a look-see now and then to make sure none of the tobacco leaves are getting moldy. In the fall, we''re all in the rolling room. I''m twelve but I''ve the delicate hands of a young woman, Grandad says, so I roll a nice cigar. Evie just turned fifteen and doesn''t like rolling; she''d rather be reading under the locust tree when the weather''s nice, but she likes to buy books with the money she earns. Our younger sister, Willa, is only six. It would''ve been a long while before Grandad told her she had hands as graceful as a dancer and rolled a cigar better than a man did.

I don''t usually spend much time in the barn when the tobacco leaves are finished with their curing, but that was where I was when Mama told Papa she''d seen Uncle Fred''s letter. I''d come home from school, done my chores, and then walked across the snowy field from our house to lie among the few remaining wooden slats that still held their toast-colored leaves. I''d been going to the curing barn a lot since my baby brother died, but Papa had forgotten I was there.

"I''ve been thinking about Philadelphia," Mama said. Papa had been checking the empty laths for rot and weak spots. He was a couple rows over from me, and I was on my back on the dirt behind a crate, looking up at the leafy ball gowns. The last time Mama had been to Philadelphia was when Henry was still alive. She and Evie had taken him to see a doctor, and they''d come home with the awful news that he wasn''t going to get better. There was no doctor in the city or on the face of the whole earth who could cure Henry.

"I think we should go," Mama had said.

At first I thought Willa must be sick now, and that was why Mama wanted to go to Philadelphia again. Or Evie. Or maybe I was the sick one and I didn''t even know it yet. But then Mama added she''d seen Uncle Fred''s latest letter asking Papa to come work for him in Philadelphia, and now she was thinking it was a good idea after all.

"What made you change your mind?" Papa sounded surprised.

A second or two went by before Mama answered him. "Everything."

Papa paused a moment, too, before he said, "If we do this, I don''t think we can undo it."

"I know."

"We won''t be able to get back here that often, Pauline. Not at first."

"I know that, too," Mama said. "If I can bring the girls back to see the family for a week or two in the summer, I can be content with that."

"I don''t suppose your parents will be too keen about this. Especially your mother."

"No, maybe not. But you know how she is. She''ll quietly stew on it a bit, and then she''ll be done. I think in the end she wants us to be happy. I know that''s what I''d want for us if I were her."

A funny, spirally feeling had started to wind its way inside me as my parents talked to each other. Papa and Mama were talking about moving to the city to live with Uncle Fred, a man I had only met once. He came out to Quakertown when Granny died. Not Mama''s mama, Papa''s. When I was eight.

Papa had said, "Are you sure now? Are you sure this is what you want to do?"

"It''s what you want to do, isn''t it?" Mama replied.

"It will mean a good life for you and the girls. A much better life than what I''m giving you here."

"You''ve given us a good life, Tom," Mama said.

"I want to give you a better one."

Then Papa said he needed to tell Grandad and break the news to the family and they''d need to sell the house. They talked for a few more minutes, but I wasn''t listening to everything they said. I was thinking about leaving my friends and the other family members and the curing barn. I couldn''t remember what Uncle Fred''s business was, but I was positive it wasn''t growing tobacco and rolling cigars. Not in the city. It was so strange to me that my parents could just decide we were leaving and we''d leave. How could we move away from where we''d buried Henry?

When Mama left, I stood up slowly so that I would see Papa before he saw me. But he was looking my direction and he saw my head clear the laths. I''m not afraid of my father. He doesn''t yell or curse or storm about when he''s angry, but he can look like he wants to. He''s tall like Grandad and has the same coffee brown eyes that glitter like stars both when he''s happy and when he''s sad. And I guess when he''s surprised, too.

"I didn''t know you were still in here," he said.

"I know."

"Did you hear everything?"

I nodded.

He gave me a very serious look. "You can''t say anything to anybody, not even your sisters, until I talk to Grandad first. You understand?"

"Are we moving to Philadelphia?"

He hesitated a second or two before answering, like he almost couldn''t believe it was true himself. "Yes," he said.

"Why? What''s wrong with where we live right now?"

Papa moved from his row to mine. "There''s nothing wrong with where we live right now. I just have a chance to give you girls a much better home. Better schooling. Better everything. My uncle Fred doesn''t have any children. He has no one to leave his home and business to. He wants to leave them to me when he dies. To us. He has a very nice house, Mags. Electric lights in every room. Hot water from the tap."

"And so just like that, we''re going?"

"Mama and I''ve been thinking on it awhile."

"All my friends are here."

"You will make new ones. I promise you will."

"Henry''s here." My throat felt hot and thick as I said Henry''s name. I looked away from Papa, and in the direction of the cemetery, even though I couldn''t see it from inside the curing barn.

Papa put his hands gently on my shoulders so that I would turn my head to face him again. "Henry''s in heaven. He''s not in the graveyard here-you know that. We''re not leaving him; we''re taking him with us in our hearts."

I reached up to flick away a couple tears that wanted to trail down my face.

"I need you to promise you won''t say anything. Not yet," Papa said.

I didn''t answer.

"Maggie, I want your word now."

"I promise," I finally whispered.

"All right, then." He took one hand off my shoulders, but left the other one as he began to lead us toward the big door that led outside. "When I tell your sisters, that''s when you''ll know it''s okay to tell other people. Not until then."

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4.5 out of 54.5 out of 5
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Top reviews from the United States

Cheryl V. Schlesinger
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great, but maybe not for everyone
Reviewed in the United States on September 12, 2018
This is a wonderful book (3.5 stars) however not if one can’t handle a lengthy, depressing story for the majority of the novel. As my usual it is historical fiction during the time of WWI and the pandemic of Spanish flu. The details of this time may not be for everyone as... See more
This is a wonderful book (3.5 stars) however not if one can’t handle a lengthy, depressing story for the majority of the novel. As my usual it is historical fiction during the time of WWI and the pandemic of Spanish flu. The details of this time may not be for everyone as it is pretty horrific as this flu claims thousands of lives. And the story takes place at a funeral home! But the characters are rich and the writing vivid and the story so engrossing and endearing in many ways.
Each chapter comes from the first person perspective of each of the female characters...the mother Pauline, and daughters Evie, Maggie and Willa. I loved Pauline, Evie and Maggie most of all but admit I could have slapped Willa silly on more than one occasion! But remember strong dislike of a character only means the author is gifted in her storytelling! It is indifference that makes a book boring ....and I was never bored reading this from page one!
54 people found this helpful
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sir henry
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A nice surprise
Reviewed in the United States on November 27, 2019
I normally would not have picked up a book like this, but in the early 1990''s I met an elderly woman who lost both her mother and her father within two days to the Spanish influenza in Philadelphia when she was a young child. She ended up being raised by her sisters. By the... See more
I normally would not have picked up a book like this, but in the early 1990''s I met an elderly woman who lost both her mother and her father within two days to the Spanish influenza in Philadelphia when she was a young child. She ended up being raised by her sisters. By the time I met her, she was elderly and had lost her sight, but she said she could still see, in her mind, how the caskets were stacked out on the street in front of the row houses.
What I found in "As Bright as Heaven" was much like what this kind, elderly woman told me about her experiences in 1918, Philadelphia.
What I wasn''t expecting was the story itself, and the excellent writing of Susan Meissner. Finding satisfying fiction these days is harder and harder to get. which is why I generally stick to the classics, or non-fiction. Charles Todd is another exception. But the surprises Meissner inserts in her tale reminded me a bit of Thornton Wilder''s "The Eighth Day", and even my own novel, "Darling Liberty" which touches on age-differences in love, and recovery from disappointment and even death. Meissner''s characters stayed true to themselves, right down to the spoiled brat, Willa. If people felt some of the so-called coincidences in the story were too contrived, I would question if they have ever paid attention to the bigger picture of ones lives. Such things happen everyday, if we''re watching.
I liked this book, and the hooks and weaves it gave me.
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Susan Yates-Brown
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Spanish Flu Should Have Been the Only Focus
Reviewed in the United States on April 3, 2019
My three star rating is for the interesting portrayal of the Spanish Flu epidemic and the impact that it had on a Philadelphia family. The thoughtful research into this period of history and the author’s use of a funeral home as front seat perspective for this plague made... See more
My three star rating is for the interesting portrayal of the Spanish Flu epidemic and the impact that it had on a Philadelphia family. The thoughtful research into this period of history and the author’s use of a funeral home as front seat perspective for this plague made for a generally solid story, but there were some huge clunkers in this book that made me roll my eyes more than once and reduce my rating. For me, the story scope should have remained focused on the family’s experience with the flu. We didn’t need the clunky romances with the barely fleshed out suitors, one stolen from the storyline of “The Best Years of Our Lives” and the other from “Jane Eyre”. We definitely didn’t need the unbelievable coincidence in the asylum, and the fourteen year old in the speakeasy was too much of a distraction. The Spanish Flu itself lent enough intensity to make this novel readable and memorable. As it is, I’m glad to be done with it.
22 people found this helpful
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Chicachiflada
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Beautifully written family drama during the 1918 pandemic
Reviewed in the United States on April 17, 2020
This book is a thoroughly researched fictional account of a family drama, during the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic. It has a really well written plot, with complex situations that bring out moral questions and motivations. This book is about major life decisions and love... See more
This book is a thoroughly researched fictional account of a family drama, during the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic. It has a really well written plot, with complex situations that bring out moral questions and motivations. This book is about major life decisions and love lasting ideals, real love vs the idea of love and the entwined family life in a large family.

The characters are well rounded and their developmemt is quite spectacular. The three sisters are really blossoming during their youth and become accomplished young ladies, despite the psychological traumas they each carry with themselves.

I loved this book to the core, the way it made me question current events and the way it made me feel. It is a super addictive read and it sticks to you. I have been reflecting on it for a few days already and I still have it fresh in my mind. Highly recommended to fans of historical fiction and family dramas.
10 people found this helpful
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ed u c8
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Very disappointed
Reviewed in the United States on April 6, 2020
I purchased this book becuase the setting was Philadelphia during the Flu of 1918. The inaccuracies relating to the Philadelphia landscape made me wonder if the author ever set foot in the city of Brotherly Love. The manner in which the author describes the setting is... See more
I purchased this book becuase the setting was Philadelphia during the Flu of 1918. The inaccuracies relating to the Philadelphia landscape made me wonder if the author ever set foot in the city of Brotherly Love. The manner in which the author describes the setting is off-putting to anyone with a working knowledge of the city. One scene in the book has the lead character rendering aid in a poor ethinic area of the city. This scene in itself would have been totally accurate if the author had actually chosen one of the ethnic groups which had inhabited the area at the time, mainly Irish, Italian, German, Russian, or Polish. I seem to remember that the author selected a Croatian community.
I truly wanted to like this book. My family lived this story, in Philadelphia.
I continued to read the book, even though the setting did not make sense, and was equally frustrated by the characters.
This is the first time that I have ever written a review for a book. I can not, in all honesty, recommend this book for purchase. I wouldn''t even suggest borrowing it from the library.
8 people found this helpful
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Kindle Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A good attitude makes all the difference
Reviewed in the United States on March 10, 2018
I really enjoyed these characters and the story of the Bright family. Their love of family and strong faith in humanity was uplifting. This was such a positive book even though there were losses and sorrow suffered by many. I have enjoyed several novels by his author and... See more
I really enjoyed these characters and the story of the Bright family. Their love of family and strong faith in humanity was uplifting. This was such a positive book even though there were losses and sorrow suffered by many. I have enjoyed several novels by his author and this one did not disappoint me. I would highly recommend this book.
15 people found this helpful
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Bren 1922
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Very empathetic view of the Spanish Flu pandemic. Good book.
Reviewed in the United States on March 29, 2018
I loved reading the different perspectives of how people lived through the Spanish Flu epidemic. In modern times we have no idea what a pandemic is like and this lets us know how lucky we have been. The writer gives details realistically without being sensationalilstic... See more
I loved reading the different perspectives of how people lived through the Spanish Flu epidemic. In modern times we have no idea what a pandemic is like and this lets us know how lucky we have been. The writer gives details realistically without being sensationalilstic about it.

Centering the story in a funeral home is a perfect way to have the setting show the drama and hopelessness of the service providers during the crisis. They were at the very center of the crisis, and you felt great empathy for the characters as it affected the whole family. I loved the book.

There were some places where the ancillary characters meandered around a bit but it was worth it to read.
11 people found this helpful
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Brittany Tellefsen
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Solid Historical Fiction from a Time Period Not Often Covered
Reviewed in the United States on September 4, 2021
It is 1818. Pauline and her husband Thomas have made the decision to move them and their three girls from rural Quakertown to Philadelphia where Thomas''s uncle owns a mortuary and wants Thomas to become his heir. Thomas learns the ropes of undertaking and Pauline finds... See more
It is 1818. Pauline and her husband Thomas have made the decision to move them and their three girls from rural Quakertown to Philadelphia where Thomas''s uncle owns a mortuary and wants Thomas to become his heir. Thomas learns the ropes of undertaking and Pauline finds herself drawn to the business as well. Still grieving the loss of her infant son, Pauline becomes fascinated by death and decides to become their beautician, giving one last act of dignity to the dead before burial.

But it is the height of WWI and all those must do their part for the war effort, including Thomas who is drafted, leaving Pauline to look after their three children (Evelyn, Maggie, and Willa). But that is not the worse that is happening, as the Spanish flu comes to America, ravaging Philadelphia include the Bright family.

Told from Pauline''s perspective as well as the perspective of the three girls, we follow the Bright family as they weather the storm of the war and the flu, doing whatever it takes to survive. And then....the aftermath of all decisions that were made during their time of struggle.

Before I complete my review, there are two "warnings" I would like to impart to those who intend to read this. "Warning" is such a dire word and makes this more ominous than I mean it, but I simply want to give readers proper expectations.

First, this story is 100% character-driven, with very little plot. As a person who far prefers to dive deeply into individual character narratives, this story suited me, as do most Historical Fictions as they all seem very character-focused. But if you need a great deal of plot or even a heavy dose of a plot to carry a story, this one is not for you.

Additionally, this story is set against the backdrop of the Spanish Flu. The Spanish Flu is the not the main focus or even the main event. It is primarily a story of family and what this family does to survive the horrors of 1818, but that is only the first portion of the story. The second half of this book takes place 7 years in the future, after the events of the Spanish Flu. So really, the flu was an instigator to the choices made that influenced the future timeline, but the Flu itself did not feel as though it was the main character during this book. It is important, and you never forget it is there or how it affected people, but overall, you are following the Bright family.

I enjoyed my time with the Bright family, seeing their progress from 1818 and the struggles they faced, to the outcomes in 2025/2026. However, I do have some technical choices that I took issue with.

First, I am not sure I saw the value or purpose of including Willa''s perspective. At the start of the story, Willa is 6 years old and obviously cannot contribute much. Then as a teenager, her storyline is very superfluous, almost separate from anything else happing in the story, and did not add anything whatsoever. In some ways, I would have rather her perspective be replaced by Jamie''s, although, he was absent for a chunk of the book.

Speaking of Jamie...though I did, in the end, route for him and Maggie, I did not believe in the development of their relationship. When this story begins, Maggie is 12, and Jamie is 20/21, and about to go to the front lines. She and Jamie have a connection, and of course, at 12 Maggie is infatuated with Jamie. She writes to him constantly during his time in the war, and even afterward when he briefly returns and then flees to deal with his personal demons. She mostly writes to him that whole time until she realizes it is pointless and stops.

Once he finally returns, and relays to Maggie the importance of those letters, that is when their relationship truly starts to develop. But I mean.....for many years, Maggie was just an infatuated little girl who then grows up to believe Jamie was always her one true love and there could never be anyone else. Really? At 12 years old? And how was Jamie viewing the letters he received while Maggie was such a young age? That is never really explained during th story.

Another relationship I did not quite buy or agree with, was Evelyn''s relationship with Conrad. I won''t go into details here, but if you''ve read this, you will likely know what I am referencing. It was yet another "I could not possibly love another person" even though Conrad and Evelyn never formally dated or did anything of that nature because of his current circumstances, yet Evelyn swears that she needs Conrad to be happy. Okay, then.

So, there were definitely decisions here I felt were implausible or unbelievable but as this was a story about family, and famileis are often messy, complicated, irrational, and emotional, it makes sense there would be content in here didn''t personally agree with or relate to. I do know, however, that I will definitely read more from Susan Meissner in the future!
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Top reviews from other countries

Willow
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I personally have always thought it was a barbaric and unnecessary process. Coincidence
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 11, 2018
I couldn''t get past page 47. Why do we need a detailed graphic description of an embalming room, equipment and process? I personally have always thought it was a barbaric and unnecessary process. Coincidence? Yesterday, a Russian woman was embalmed while alive during an...See more
I couldn''t get past page 47. Why do we need a detailed graphic description of an embalming room, equipment and process? I personally have always thought it was a barbaric and unnecessary process. Coincidence? Yesterday, a Russian woman was embalmed while alive during an operation. True, not Fake News, look it up. What was otherwise a seemingly promising novel for me was thrown in the trash.
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matthew roberts-ward
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Truly inciteful
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 25, 2020
Amazing story about what it it felt like to go through Spanish influenza of 1918 and how it can be related to Corona virus 2019
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Michelle
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Loved this book
Reviewed in Canada on January 25, 2019
A very emotional ride! I enjoyed reading about the Spanish flu - and quickly realized how little I knew! I couldn’t put this book down.
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Shari Decter Hirst
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A wonderful Story
Reviewed in Canada on February 20, 2018
I loved the story of the Bright family. At times it was so sad, and other times so joyful. Beautifully written
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Tweedvale Girl Book Reviews
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great book, sad and that''s how it was during ...
Reviewed in Australia on July 6, 2018
Great book, sad and that''s how it was during the time of the Spanish flu was killing so many people.
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As Bright lowest wholesale as Heaven outlet sale

As Bright lowest wholesale as Heaven outlet sale

As Bright lowest wholesale as Heaven outlet sale